Teaching Science in Diverse Settings: Marginalized Discourses and Classroom Practice

Teaching Science in Diverse Settings: Marginalized Discourses and Classroom Practice

Teaching Science in Diverse Settings: Marginalized Discourses and Classroom Practice

Teaching Science in Diverse Settings: Marginalized Discourses and Classroom Practice

Synopsis

The essays in this book draw from current debates concerning schooling & the need for liberatory education, the social construction of science & of identity & systems of race, class & gender oppression & domination. These works force us to confront such questions as, How can we shape practice & curriculum to address the needs of diverse learners? In what ways do the marginalized discourses in theory & practice push us to fundamentally reformulate our conceptions of teachers/teaching, students/learning & subject matter knowledge (science & what it means to know & do science) & the multiple relationships between & among these domains? In what ways do the marginalized discourses in theory & practice push us to fundamentally reformulate our conceptions of "science for all?" What it really means, in the day-to-day practice of teachers, to enact more liberating pedagogies? This collection serves to educate readers about the importance, history & possibilities for marginalized discourses in science education & also to engage readers in multiple cases where contributors have systematically applied & examined what happens when these theoretical frames are brought to bear in classroom practice. (K-12 science & science teacher education)

Excerpt

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This edited volume by Angela Calabrese Barton and Margery Osborne appears at an important time for science education. Throughout our global science education community, the rhetoric of 'science education for all' is juxtaposed to the reality of 'science education for the privileged'. It is imperative for science educators to begin to reflect upon: the history of the discipline of science education and the ways in which it has been enacted in the process of schooling; the hegemony of logical positivism and technical rationality and its uncritical acceptance within the discipline of science education; the ways in which science and science education have marginalized both learners and citizens in society; the ways in which traditional interpretations of knowledge have been connected to power and the relationship between power and knowledge; and, finally, the ways in which the discipline of science education can be transformed such that the political and social aspects of science are moved to the center of philosophical reflection upon the sciences, from its present position somewhere beyond the margins. Science educators must articulate a vision of and assume agency for an education in science that creates opportunities for self- and social-empowerment, whereby all learners are able to engage in participatory action-taking in a democratic society (see Kyle 1991, 1999a, 1999b).

This book offers a stark and refreshing contrast to the neoconservative agenda that permeates present-day international educational policy making, in which the notion exists that science education will be transformed by implementing standards, assessing students' technical knowledge and understandings, and engaging in cross-national comparisons of student . . .

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