Ninety-Five Languages and Seven Forms of Intelligence: Education in the Twenty-First Century

Ninety-Five Languages and Seven Forms of Intelligence: Education in the Twenty-First Century

Ninety-Five Languages and Seven Forms of Intelligence: Education in the Twenty-First Century

Ninety-Five Languages and Seven Forms of Intelligence: Education in the Twenty-First Century

Synopsis

"Classrooms of the future will be multicultural classrooms. Ninety-five Languages and Seven Forms of Intelligence uses a multidimensional approach to examine the relationship between multicultural classrooms and border cities in the postmodern era. D. Emily Hicks argues that the diverse nature of the students in classrooms of the next century demand that we rethink the notions of community, citizenship, and the state. Drawing on the work of Paolo Freire, Gilles Deleuze, Felix Guattari, and Antonio Negri, while using literary examples of Chicano/a literature, this text bridges the fields of pedagogical theory and cultural studies." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

My own introduction to social injustice began in 1960 when I was nine years old and spent several weeks at a twelfth century Hopi village, Old Oraibi, the oldest continuously occupied town in the United States. Although the non-Hopi children had been invited by the Hopi to participate in this cultural exchange, no non-Hopi adults were allowed. The project was arranged through the San Diego Museum of Man. I slept in a schoolhouse in a sleeping bag and ate meals prepared by the Hopi P.T.A. All of the children played together inside and outside of the house. The yards were dirt, with few trees. We all played ball outside and ran in the small houses through the front doors and out the back doors. I don't remember any other toys, and there were no televisions, but we were never bored. It was always sad when my group had to return to the schoolhouse to spend the night.

My favorite memories are two: first, spending one whole afternoon sitting with a grandmother in her house while she was weaving, and second, watching the making of rolled flat bread in an outdoor stone oven, waiting for it to cook and eating it warm. I attended a snake dance, under a relentless sun, and I was amazed that no one was bitten, and no one seemed to fear the snakes. I bought two Kachina dolls, which I still have. Although I later read in our instructions, years after this experience, that we were not to take photographs during our stay, I remember that I did, and I do not remember anyone asking me not to take pictures. I collected about two dozen pottery shards, which were dated by archeologists when we returned. According to the archeologist who examined my collection, I had some twelfth century shards. I also remember that some families told us about having to drive forty miles for water. The injustice of this outraged me, and I could not understand how this could be allowed by the government.

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