The "E" Is for Everything: E-Commerce, E-Business, and E-Learning in Higher Education

The "E" Is for Everything: E-Commerce, E-Business, and E-Learning in Higher Education

The "E" Is for Everything: E-Commerce, E-Business, and E-Learning in Higher Education

The "E" Is for Everything: E-Commerce, E-Business, and E-Learning in Higher Education

Synopsis

Volume 2 of the EDUCAUSE Leadership Strategies Series

Organizations worldwide have embraced electronic commerce as one of the most important evolving trends. The shift from paper-based commerce to commerce across electronic networks will significantly change the ways in which higher education business is conducted. This transformation is likely to impact core delivery systems and institutional strategies, ultimately requiring new approaches to supporting and fulfilling institutional missions through e-business and e-learning. Second in the EDUCAUSE Leadership Strategies series, this volume outlines major opportunities and challenges for colleges and universities as they take steps to:

• Evaluate their readiness to conduct business online

• Build technology infrastructure and expertise to support e-business

• Rethink campus and national data systems in an e-learning environment

• Establish online relationships with suppliers, partners, and consumers

• Address network access, security, and privacy challenges
Writing for leaders, administrators, and policy makers, the authors strive to clarify the nature of doing business over the Internet and help campuses develop sound policies and practices for a networked future.

Excerpt

In September 2010, Jennifer S. walked onto the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) campus for the first time. She and her entering freshman classmates represented the first class of the Web generation—young people born with a silver mouse at their workstation. Few had known the world without the World Wide Web. Though new to the university, Jennifer had had numerous virtual tours of the campus. In fact, the campus's intelligent recruitment agent, VirtuaSlug, first contacted her over the Web in tenth grade as a result of her PSAT scores and a review of her electronic transcripts. Jennifer selected UCSC because of its academic reputation, redwood groves, proximity to the beach, and “safe distance” from her mother's home in San Francisco. It did not hurt that her two closest friends had also chosen UCSC. They would all be living in Crown College, one of UCSC's residential colleges.

Jennifer arrived at the campus having already completed two semesters of collegiate work, including an oceanography course taught at her high school by a member of the UCSC faculty. This course, which combined work on the Web with personal appearances by the professor, was offered in her junior year and factored heavily into Jennifer's decision to attend UCSC. Jennifer and Professor Stephens enjoyed corresponding during his office hours. She particularly enjoyed the atmospheric models he introduced her to and that she was able . . .

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