The Cheers and the Tears: A Healthy Alternative to the Dark Side of Youth Sports Today

The Cheers and the Tears: A Healthy Alternative to the Dark Side of Youth Sports Today

The Cheers and the Tears: A Healthy Alternative to the Dark Side of Youth Sports Today

The Cheers and the Tears: A Healthy Alternative to the Dark Side of Youth Sports Today

Synopsis

The Cheers and the Tears offers parents and coaches sensible advice and healthy alternative approaches to the competitive and stressful world of youth sports.

"Full of practical and helpful ideas for parents who want their child's youth sports experience to be a success.... Refreshing, honest, and down to earth."
--Joan Ryan, author, Little Girls in Pretty Boxes; columnist, San Francisco Chronicle

"Shane Murphy understands parents and helps them help their children. His guidance is immensely practical. This book is essential reading for anyone who works with children in sports."
--Christy Ness, Olympic figure skating coach, coached Kristi Yamaguchi to the 1992 Olympic Gold Medal in Women's Figure Skating

"The Cheer and the Tears is terrific! Shane Murphy provides excellent solutions to tough issues. If your child is involved in organized sports at any level, read this book!"
--Sean McCann, sport psychologist, United States Olympic Committee

Excerpt

I love being involved in youth sports. I love the fun that children have playing their favorite games, the way that youth sports can bring families together, and the way that sports can teach children wonderful lessons about teamwork, setting goals, and the value of hard work.

I hate being involved in youth sports. I hurt when a thirteen-year-old athlete sits down with me and tells me how much she dislikes all the practice she is doing, how she would rather be doing something else, but how she doesn't want to tell her parents and hurt their feelings. I become angry when I see parents on the side-lines screaming at their kids, making everyone around them uncomfortable and ruining the experience for their children. I get sick when I hear about the latest episode of violence in youth sports— a parent punching an official, a coach shoving a child, parents fighting in the stands.

I'm standing on the sidelines at John Q. Yancy Park in Fairfield County, Connecticut, on a blustery Saturday morning in the fall. Five soccer fields are laid out in the park, and more than a hundred young children mill around, happily playing soccer. Nearly that many parents are watching with me from the sidelines. With the athletes' brightly colored uniforms, the shouts from parents, the blasts from the whistles of the officials, and the yelling of the . . .

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