Personality and Work: Reconsidering the Role of Personality in Organizations

Personality and Work: Reconsidering the Role of Personality in Organizations

Personality and Work: Reconsidering the Role of Personality in Organizations

Personality and Work: Reconsidering the Role of Personality in Organizations

Synopsis

The subject of personality has received increasing attention from industrial/organizational psychologists in both research and practice settings over the past decade. But while there is an overabundance of information related to the narrow area of personality testing and employee selection, there has been no definitive source offering a broader perspective on the overall topic of personality in the workplace. Personality and Work at last provides an in-depth examination of the role of personality in work behavior. An array of expert authors discusses the connection of personality to a wide range of outcomes beyond performance, including counterproductive behaviors, contextual performance, retaliatory behaviors, retention, learning, knowledge creation, and the process of sharing that knowledge. Throughout the book, the authors present theoretical perspectives, introduce new models and frameworks, and integrate and synthesize prior studies in ways that will stimulate future research and practice.

Contributors to this volume include: Murray R. Barrick, Michael J. Cullen, David V. Day, Ed Diener, J. Kevin Ford, Lewis R. Goldberg, Leaetta Hough, Jeff W. Johnson, Martin J. Kilduff, Amy Kristof-Brown, Katherine E. Kurek, Richard E. Lucas, Terence R. Mitchell, Michael K. Mount, Frederick L. Oswald, Ann Marie Ryan, Paul R. Sackett, Gerard Saucier, Greg L. Stewart, Howard M. Weiss

Excerpt

This is the nineteenth book in a series initiated by the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology in 1983 (SIOP) and published by Jossey-Bass. Originally published as the Frontiers Series, the SIOP Executive Committee voted in 2000 to change the name of the series to Organizational Frontiers Series in order to enhance the identity and visibility of the series. The purpose of the publication of series volumes in a general sense was to promote the scientific status of the field. Ray Katzell first edited the series, and Irwin Goldstein and Sheldon Zedeck followed him.

The editorial board chooses the topics of the volumes and the volume editors. The series editor and the editorial board then work with the volume editor in planning the volume and, occasionally, in suggesting and selecting chapter authors and content. During the writing of the volume, the series editor often works with the editor and the publisher to bring the manuscript to completion.

The success of the series is evident in the high number of sales (now over forty-five thousand). Volumes have received excellent reviews, and individual chapters as well as volumes have been cited frequently. A recent symposium at the SIOP annual meeting examined the impact of the series on research and theory in industrial/ organizational (I/O) psychology. Although such influence is difficult to track and volumes have varied in intent and perceived centrality to the discipline, the conclusion of most participants was that the volumes have exerted a significant impact on research and theory in the field and are regarded as being representative of the best the field has to offer.

Another purpose of the series was to bring scientific research from other disciplines to bear on problems of interest to I/O psychologists. This volume, edited by Murray Barrick and Ann Marie Ryan, provides an in-depth examination of the role of personality . . .

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