The Jossey-Bass Academic Administrator's Guide to Conflict Resolution

The Jossey-Bass Academic Administrator's Guide to Conflict Resolution

The Jossey-Bass Academic Administrator's Guide to Conflict Resolution

The Jossey-Bass Academic Administrator's Guide to Conflict Resolution

Synopsis

Dealing with conflict is an evitable part of any academic administrator's job. Often, however, new administrators lack the skills they need to successfully resolve campus conflicts. This important resource includes an array of strategies for identifying and managing conflict between individuals, within a department, and between departments. The Jossey-Bass Academic Administrator's Guide to Conflict Resolution shows how to turn conflicts into problems to be solved. Authors Sandra I. Cheldelin and Ann F. Lucas offer concrete approaches academic administrators can use to analyze conflicts and design effective interventions. The Jossey-Bass Academic Administrator's Guide to Conflict Resolution is an invaluable tool that includes

Guidelines for knowing when it is appropriate to intervene in a conflict

Strategies for helping to change irrational and negative thinking to positive rational thought

Methods for handling interpersonal conflict-between two parties-within a department

An outline of the major approaches for managing conflict and information when they work and when they don't

Effective strategies for preventing and solving specific problems

Excerpt

The often used metaphor of higher education as an ivory tower suggests that it is a tranquil place, far removed from the struggles of daily life and free of stress and conflict. But colleges and universities are made up of individuals who have been trained to be critical of others and of themselves, and socialized to probe arguments through analysis and to find flaws in the logic of others' thinking. With the exception of a few disciplines that aim to prepare graduates to work effectively with people, there are usually no courses on how to provide this criticism tactfully within a supportive relationship. There are no credits to be earned for learning to be a good team player or team leader.

PURPOSE

Within this conceptual framework, we have written a book on conflict resolution specifically for new leaders—or new in the role of leadership— employed in academic institutions. In the chapters that follow, we identify how conflicts can be diagnosed and what academic administrators can do to turn conflicts into problems to be solved. Learning about and using conflict management strategies can enhance one's professional development. Passively waiting for the combatants in an institutional setting to solve their own problems may take years, during which time others may become engaged in the conflict, sides are taken, coalitions are formed, and a department becomes fragmented. So knowing when and how to intervene in a conflict is important for leaders.

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