Second Tier Cities: Rapid Growth beyond the Metropolis

Second Tier Cities: Rapid Growth beyond the Metropolis

Second Tier Cities: Rapid Growth beyond the Metropolis

Second Tier Cities: Rapid Growth beyond the Metropolis

Excerpt

In the past twenty years, accelerated transnational investment and trade have increasingly integrated national economies, disrupting traditional patterns of urban and regional growth. In many countries, newer, smaller cities have been growing at the expense of older, larger ones, upsetting urban hierarchies. In the United States, for example, employment in the Los Angeles metropolitan area surpassed that of New York's in 1990 for the first time historically, and dozens of medium-sized cities are growing faster than the top ten. Despite tenacious histories of dominance, other major national, even world, cities are also losing ground as their functions are usurped by newcomers and as altogether new functions rise to the fore. Rio de Janeiro has lost out absolutely to São Paulo and Brasilia, as industrial leadership and political leadership have flowed to the latter. In countries like Japan and South Korea, where Tokyo and Seoul remain dominant, outlying areas and detached cities are growing relatively faster than the core cities.

A major phenomenon accompanying this shake-up has been the rise of “second tier” cities, spatially distinct areas of economic activity where a specialized set of trade-oriented industries takes root and flourishes, establishing employment and population-growth trajectories that are the envy of many other places. In the United States, the semiconductor and computing complex of Silicon Valley, the aerospace and electronics complex in Orange County, Route 128 west of Boston, and Research Triangle in North Carolina are most frequently showcased in this regard. In Europe, where urban hierarchies have been less volatile, revitalized older industrial regions, such as Emilia Romagna in Italy or Baden-Württemberg in Germany, are among the more outstanding cases. In Brazil, the growth of cities like Campinas, Manaus, Brasilia, and Curitiba are turning the tide of . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.