Late Innings: A Documentary History of Baseball, 1945-1972

Late Innings: A Documentary History of Baseball, 1945-1972

Late Innings: A Documentary History of Baseball, 1945-1972

Late Innings: A Documentary History of Baseball, 1945-1972

Synopsis

From the reviews of Early Innings and Middle Innings: "Dean Sullivan... has sifted the archives to compile and edit nearly a century of lost or forgotten baseball essays and news reports.... Give[s] readers a box seat at the game that became a national obsession."-London Review of Books. "A fascinating collection."-Washington Post. "This original collection of fascinating documents... brings seldom-seen sources to the fingertips of historians and serious fans.... There are many gems here."-Library Journal. "An enthralling collection of documents that take the reader through a colorful journey of baseball history. A great book."-Ernie Harwell. Late Innings: A Documentary History of Baseball, 1945-1972 is the third volume in Dean A. Sullivan's successful series on the vibrant history of baseball. Through 114 contemporary documents, Late Innings examines everything from Jackie Robinson's ground-breaking assault on the color barrier to Roger Maris's run on the home run record to the first stirrings of labor-management unrest in the 1970s. Late Innings also looks at exciting on-field activities, the antitrust controversy, issues of expansion, the effect of television on the game, and several other points of interest swirling around baseball in postwar America. Dean A. Sullivan is the editor of Early Innings: A Documentary History of Baseball, 1825-1908 and Middle Innings: A Documentary History of Baseball, 1900-1948, both available in Bison Books editions.

Excerpt

My earliest memories of baseball date from the 1971 World Series. As an eight-year-old living in northern Virginia, I could not understand why my older brother and sister were supporting the Pittsburgh Pirates rather than the Baltimore Orioles, a local team. Their explanation that the Orioles were the rivals of their beloved Washington Senators and that they were left with no choice but to root against the Orioles made no sense to me. Nor did I understand that I would never have a chance to cheer on the Senators, since the club had already announced its plans to abandon the nation's capital for greener pastures in Arlington, Texas. Nevertheless, a lifetime love affair with baseball had been ignited. Since that time I have learned to embrace the Orioles, though I still harbor hopes that in the near future I will be able to experience the joy of living and dying with a home team, either in Virginia or in Washington.

In the meantime I have invested my time researching the history of baseball through a study of pertinent documents, including newspaper and magazine articles, evidence presented before Congress, private letters, official league communications, legal decisions and law journal articles, and countless books. I have spent hundreds of hours at the Library of Congress, made frequent trips to the National Baseball Hall of Fame Library, and examined more than half a dozen collections of papers. As in my previous two books, Early Innings and Middle Innings, I have worked hard to discover documents that collectively depict a portrait of professional baseball, with this volume focusing on the period between the end of World War II and the conclusion of the Curt Flood legal saga.

I would like to thank the staffs of the libraries and archives who assisted me, including the Library of Congress; the Hagley Museum and Library in Greenville, Delaware; the University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee Area Research Center in Milwaukee; and the State Historical Society of Wisconsin in Madison, Wisconsin. William Gamson, Reynolds Farley, Phillip Converse, Jay Demarath, James McDonald, and Ernie Harwell helped me pin down the origins of the Baseball Seminar—a game they pioneered in the early 1960s—and demonstrate that it was a direct predecessor to Rotisserie Baseball. F. X. Flinn also provided me with information on the early history of Rotisserie Baseball. Bob Bailey and Tim Wiles (the director of research at the National Baseball Hall of Fame Library) contributed documents for the book, and Lyle K. Wilson sent me copies of several of his articles on African Americans in baseball. The Office of the Secretary of State of Illinois promptly . . .

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