A Final Promise: The Campaign to Assimilate the Indians, 1880-1920

A Final Promise: The Campaign to Assimilate the Indians, 1880-1920

A Final Promise: The Campaign to Assimilate the Indians, 1880-1920

A Final Promise: The Campaign to Assimilate the Indians, 1880-1920

Synopsis

Frederick E. Hoxie is director of the D'Arcy McNickle Center for the History of the American Indian at the Newberry Library. He coedited (with Joan Mark) E. Jane Gay's With the Nez Percés: Alice Fletcher in the Field, 1889-92 (Nebraska 1981).

Excerpt

A Final Promise has been a very lucky book. Not only did it find an audience that has sustained it for nearly two decades, but it also caught the attention of thoughtful reviewers who have helped identify and illuminate the text's central themes. Upon publication of this new edition of A Final Promise it seems fitting to focus readers' attention on those themes.

The three aspects of the historical analysis in A Final Promise that have attracted the most attention from reviewers and that have stimulated the most discussion are (1) the precise origins of late nineteenth-century Indian policy, (2) the shifting definition of the term “assimilation” used by policymakers from 1880 to 1920, and (3) the relationship of Indian people to this “assimilation era.” Each of these topics has generated questions, both for me, the author, and for other historians who have written about them since the book first appeared.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.