Resisting Marginalization: Unemployment Experience and Social Policy in the European Union

Resisting Marginalization: Unemployment Experience and Social Policy in the European Union

Resisting Marginalization: Unemployment Experience and Social Policy in the European Union

Resisting Marginalization: Unemployment Experience and Social Policy in the European Union

Synopsis

This is a major new contribution to work on unemployment in Europe. Leading scholars come together to provide a comparative analysis of social policies for combating marginalization of the unemployed across the European Union. Drawing on the results of important research programmes funded by the European Commission, the book puts forward the case for a substantial revision of current policy priorities.

Excerpt

Duncan Gallie

Recent years have seen a rapid growth of comparative research into unemployment. in particular, this has focused on two issues: the factors that determine the risks of marginalization resulting from unemployment and the growth of new social activation policies designed to reintegrate the unemployed. These have been largely treated as separate spheres of research. Yet they have important implications for each other. Policies designed to facilitate reintegration into the labour market involve crucial assumptions about the mechanisms that lead to the marginalization of the unemployed. Policies are likely to be successful only insofar as they are based on a well-grounded understanding of the underlying sources of labour market vulnerability and the barriers that prevent people from re-entering employment. the objective of this book is to bring the results of recent research into the processes underlying marginalization together with research into the new policy initiatives. How far do such policies address the factors that have been shown to be the crucial determinants of entrapment?

The chapters draw upon a number of research projects funded by the European Union under the Fourth and Fifth Framework Programmes. They each involved large-scale multi-country research groups that were able to provide in-depth expertise on the countries involved. Taken together they offer at least two major strengths.

First, the range of countries covered by the studies provides particularly good leverage for assessing some of the key arguments that have been developed. Theories of entrapment are frequently of a universal character, implying that similar factors will be responsible for

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