The Armenians: Past and Present in the Making of National Identity

The Armenians: Past and Present in the Making of National Identity

The Armenians: Past and Present in the Making of National Identity

The Armenians: Past and Present in the Making of National Identity

Synopsis

A comprehensive introduction to the historical forces and recent social and political developments that have shaped today's Armenian people. With contributions from leading Armenian, American and European specialists, the book focuses on identity formation, exploring how the Armenians' perceptions of themselves and their place in the world are informed by their history, culture and present-day situation. The book also covers contemporary politics, economy and society, and relates these to ongoing debates over future directions for the Armenian people, both in the homeland and in the diaspora communities.

Excerpt

Except in chapter 2, 'Early Armenian Civilization', Armenian words are transliterated according to a simplified version of the Society for Armenian Studies system, with the diacritic accents omitted. Where accepted English forms of Armenian words and names exist, these are preferred to transliterated forms (e.g. Yerevan).

Many of the territories, towns and cities mentioned have undergone successive name changes over the centuries, often as a result of political changes such as conquests and revolutions. In general, we have used the names that will be most readily identifiable to the modern reader, while being appropriate to the context. In some cases, the name that was current (among Armenians) in the period under consideration is preferred, provided that does not obscure the identity of the place for the modern reader. Thus, for the nineteenth century we use Tiflis (Tbilisi, today the capital of Georgia) and Transcaucasia (today more commonly referred to as the South Caucasus). The more familiar (Mountainous) Karabagh, however, is used rather than Armenian (Lernayin) Gharabagh or Russian (Nagornyi) Karabakh. In some cases, for the sake of clarity, alternative versions or names of places are given in parentheses, e.g. Alexandropol (Leninakan, Kumayri, Gyumri). The forms Yerevan and Etchmiadzin are used throughout.

Personal names are given in transliterated forms, except where there is a generally accepted English spelling.

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