Competitive Industrial Development in the Age of Information: The Role of Cooperation in the Technology Sector

Competitive Industrial Development in the Age of Information: The Role of Cooperation in the Technology Sector

Competitive Industrial Development in the Age of Information: The Role of Cooperation in the Technology Sector

Competitive Industrial Development in the Age of Information: The Role of Cooperation in the Technology Sector

Synopsis

This book examines how transnational corporations, small to medium enterprises and governments have emerged as the principal players in industrial development. This valuable work examines this trend, with particular reference to the role of the tax policy in technology development, the financing of technology-sector SMEs, the role of government policy and the relationship between competition and co-operation.

Excerpt

The conception of this book arose out of a May 1995 workshop held at the Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, sponsored by the Faculty of Law (Professor Martin Friedland, then Acting Dean); Faculty of Law, Law and Economics Programme (Professor Michael Trebilcock, Director); the Toronto law firms of Borden & Elliot and Stikeman, Elliot; and the Canadian Bar Association-National Competition Law Section. the idea for a workshop on 'Competitive Industrial Development: the Role of Cooperation in the Technology Sector' evolved after Robert Howse (Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto) suggested that since Richard Braudo was going to spend the summer of 1993 in Dallas he should research the history and current status of sematech, Inc. (the consortium of us semiconductor manufacturers) in nearby Austin, Texas.

While surprisingly little had been published concerning sematech, Inc., thanks to Aaron Blumenfeld (Member, Law Society of Upper Canada and Litigation Associate, Borden & Elliot, Toronto), an introduction was obtained to Ari Reubin (Senior Manager, Personal Productivity Division, Texas Instruments, Inc., Dallas, Texas; formerly, Manager, Technology Transfer, sematech, Inc.). Through interviews of sematech personnel, the provision of in-house written material and a tour of SEMATECH's restricted access facilities, Ari Reubin facilitated a unique information gathering opportunity. With direction from Professor Robert Howse, this provided the starting point for Richard Braudo to write a research paper as a third year course, which became the springboard for the workshop and the basis for his contribution to the book.

Transforming the idea of the workshop into its actually taking place required organization well beyond the capacity of a Student-at-Law. Jeffrey MacIntosh (Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto) expressed an interest in and made commitments to both organizing and contributing a paper to the workshop. the success of the workshop, including the availability of the papers and commentaries which are the foundation of this volume, are a result of the efforts of co-editor Jeffrey MacIntosh.

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