Containing Nationalism

Containing Nationalism

Containing Nationalism

Containing Nationalism

Synopsis

'Hechter has written more for the advanced scholar of nationalism studies and cognate fields. He is already an established name in the field... Hechter's argument has considerable merits.' -The Global Review of Ethnopolitics'Chapter 2 'Causes of Nationalism', is concise, managing to provide explanations for group formation, group solidarity, the modernity of nations and national identification... the striking feature is that the author is able to usefully clarify in only fourteen pages what so many others take entire books to do.' -The Global Review of Ethnopolitics'Containing Nationalism is a trenchant discussion of a problem that shows little sign of abating. Even more, however, it is a thoughtful attempt by a veteran observer to offer a theoretical analysis with very practical implications. This book will be indispensable for academics and policymakers alike.' -Contemporary SociologyNationalism has become the most prevalent source of political conflict and violence in the world. Scholarship has provided scant guidance about the prospects of containing the dark side of nationalism-its widely publicized excesses of violence, such as ethnic cleansing and genocide. Departing from the usual practice of considering only a few examples of nationalism drawn from a limited geographical and historical canvas, this groundbreaking book is based on fundamental theoretical ideas about the formation and solidarity of groups.andlt;iandgt;

Excerpt

One Sunday morning not long ago, I walked to the Fremont farmer's market in Seattle to buy some local produce. The most bohemian neighbourhood in town, Fremont is a throwback to the informality and insouciance of the counterculture of the 1960s. At the south-western edge of the market, just beyond the tatty displays of cast-off furniture and second-hand clothes, loomed a large bronze statue of a man peering intently toward the horizon. The man was V. I. Lenin. During the past year a local entrepreneur had rescued the statue from a garbage dump in a small Russian town and brought it home to Seattle. One can only imagine the reaction of the town's officials when they learnt of his interest in shipping this relic of socialist realism half-way around the world. Why the statue ended up in Fremont is a mystery to me. In any case, some prankster had placed a red rubber traffic cone on top of Lenin's hat. This small embellishment radically altered the statue's appearance: what had originally been an intense revolutionary firebrand now had become a harmless dunce. Lenin's fate in Seattle's Fremont district is but one small reflection of a sea-change that has jolted world politics.

As the founder of the first socialist state, Lenin symbolized the hopes of the most successful branch of the international workers' movement. For most of the twentieth century, political movements based on class—in particular, socialism and communism—were regarded as the principal threat to domestic and international order by friends and foes alike. A mere sixty years ago, the spectre of

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.