Identity Formation, Agency, and Culture: A Social Psychological Synthesis

Identity Formation, Agency, and Culture: A Social Psychological Synthesis

Identity Formation, Agency, and Culture: A Social Psychological Synthesis

Identity Formation, Agency, and Culture: A Social Psychological Synthesis

Synopsis

The goal of Identity, Formation, Agency, and Culture is to lay the basis of a theory with which to better understand the difficulties and complexities of identity formation. It provides an extensive understanding of identity formation as it relates to human striving (agency) and social organization (culture). James E. Côté and Charles G. Levine have compiled state-of-the-art psychological and sociological theory and research into a concise synthesis. This volume utilizes a vast, interdisciplinary literature in a reader-friendly style. Playing the role of narrators, the authors take readers through the most important theories and studies of self and identity, focusing on pragmatic issues of identity formation--those things that matter most in people's lives.

Identity, Formation, Agency, and Culture is intended for identity-related researchers in the behavioral and social sciences, as well as clinicians, counselors, and social workers dealing with identity-related disorders. It also serves as a main or supplemental text in advanced courses on identity, identity and human development, social development, moral development, personality, the sociology of identity, and the individual and society taught in departments of psychology, sociology, human development, and family studies.

Excerpt

The concept of identity is perhaps one of the most important ideas the social sciences have investigated in recent years. Even a cursory glance at the literature reveals a burgeoning interest in identity-related issues. For example, a PsychINFO search indicates a steadily increasing number of hits on the keyword "identity" (including ego identity, social identity, identity crisis, and ethnic identity). Prior to the mid-1980s, there are only 742 hits on identity keywords, but between 1985 and 1989 alone, there are 4,186 hits. Since then, the number of hits has risen to 5,650 between 1990 and 1994, and to 7,894 between 1995 and 1999. Moreover, since the mid- 1990s, the following journals have been founded with "identity" in some form or manifestation as their focus: Identity: An International Journal of Theory and Research; Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power; The Journal of Aging and Identity; Post Identity; and Self and Identity.

A key reason for this interest, we believe, is that recent cultural changes have made forming and sustaining a sense of identity more problematic for virtually everyone in, and affected by, Western culture. At the same time, some observers see these cultural changes as making identity formation and maintenance more challenging and promising. In either case, identity formation has changed in significant ways for many young people attempting to make their way into adulthood, so much so that we are witnessing a proliferation of identity-related problems, and even pathologies. Furthermore, identity problems seem to be exacerbated for many minority youth who lack access to the cultural resources that help majority youth construct more socially rewarded identities.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.