Cybering Democracy: Public Space and the Internet

Cybering Democracy: Public Space and the Internet

Cybering Democracy: Public Space and the Internet

Cybering Democracy: Public Space and the Internet

Synopsis

In Cybering Democracy, Diana Saco boldly reconceptualizes the relationship between democratic participation and spatial realities both actual and virtual.

Excerpt

On 5 August 1993, convicted murderer Joseph Paul Jernigan was executed by lethal injection in Huntsville, Texas, leaving to scientific research, at his own request, the otherwise healthy corpse of a well-developed, thirty- nine-year-old male who was free from the ravages of disease, age, and trauma. Technicians of the state anatomical board placed Jernigan's body in one and a half gallons of one-percent formalin for temporary preservation and transported it by jet to the dissection lab of the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. There the remains were scanned by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computerized tomography (CT), frozen, and then CT scanned again, giving the dissection team an anatomical map to refer to later for alignment purposes. Using a carbide- tipped blade, the lab technicians then proceeded to saw through Jernigan's body, cutting it into four sections of approximately the same length—head to a torso, abdomen to a pelvis, thighs to knees, and calves to feet. To secure the forearm-and-hand sections next to the abdominal section and the pairs of leg sections symmetrically to each other, technicians placed corresponding body parts into aluminum molds, filled the molds with a blue gel, and then refroze the contents, producing four ice blocks of the portioned cadaver, each measuring about twenty by twenty by fifteen inches. The bluish cubes were then taken to a grinding area that was enclosed by Plexiglas to avoid debris from the corpse flying everywhere as it was sectioned further. Over the next several months, the quartered and twice-frozen body of Joseph Paul Jernigan was painstakingly sliced, millimeter by millimeter, into 1,871 cross sections. As they sectioned the corpse further, technicians polished and digitally photographed (in . . .

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