Outside Literature

Outside Literature

Outside Literature

Outside Literature

Synopsis

Charting a course between literary aesthetics and their associated politics, Bennett engages with the central concerns of Marxist critics such as Lukacs, Jameson, Eagleton and Lentricchia.

Excerpt

This book has been a long time in the making. I first began work on it in 1983. Owing to other pressures, however, I have rarely been able to devote more than a few days at a time to this work and, on occasions, have been obliged to put it to one side-festering malignantly in my filing cabinet-for several months.

These remarks have a bearing on the form of the book. When it became clear that I should have to accommodate the book's conception to these circumstances of working or abandon the project entirely, I determined on an episodic principle of organisation. Thus, rather than offering a continuing argument which develops cumulatively from chapter to chapter, I have sought, in each chapter, to deal with a relatively discrete problem. While chapters 1 and 2 constitute necessary starting points in situating the concerns of the book as a whole, the reader will find that, thereafter, each chapter can be read relatively independently of those adjacent to it. On the whole, however, I think that the chapters are best read in the order in which I have placed them.

For there is a consistency of purpose running through the book: to contribute to the development of a logic for literary analysis that will be adequately social and historical in its orientations. While I have assumed that the commitment to such a project is now sufficiently shared for this purpose to require no extensive elaboration or defence, my study is also premised on the conviction that this intention is not so easily realised as is commonly supposed. Even where a socialising and historicising logic is espoused, it is often incompletely sustained owing to the inherited weight of formalist and idealist categories and procedures which, when they are not carefully scrutinised, insinuate their way into the analysis, deflecting it from its objectives.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.