The Outlook for Literature

The Outlook for Literature

The Outlook for Literature

The Outlook for Literature

Excerpt

The modern man likes to speculate about the future. He knows so much more about this planet than did his predecessors and he has so much more confidence in his superiority over nature and chance that he is eager to project himself ahead for at least another life-time. And he is so aware of constant and tremendous change that he expects still greater change in the immediate future. He goes on the theory that things can't remain as they are. He likes to ponder over the question, what will my grandchildren live to see?

We are familiar with prophesies of larger populations, greater cities, taller skyscrapers, more rapid locomotion, greater wealth. We are familiar too with dreams of social betterment, of ideal commonwealths, of a world dwelling in peace and brotherhood. Since Sir Thomas More four hundred years ago penned his "Utopia," one of the first modern books in England, we have taken many imaginary voyages to realms which are interesting chiefly because they offer hopeful or direful examples of what we may become. We have been very reluctant to give over the faith in a return to the Garden of Eden, to the Golden Age with . . .

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