The World after the Peace Conference: Being an Epilogue to the 'History of the Peace Conference of Paris' and a Prologue to the 'survey of International Affairs, 1920-1923,'

The World after the Peace Conference: Being an Epilogue to the 'History of the Peace Conference of Paris' and a Prologue to the 'survey of International Affairs, 1920-1923,'

The World after the Peace Conference: Being an Epilogue to the 'History of the Peace Conference of Paris' and a Prologue to the 'survey of International Affairs, 1920-1923,'

The World after the Peace Conference: Being an Epilogue to the 'History of the Peace Conference of Paris' and a Prologue to the 'survey of International Affairs, 1920-1923,'

Excerpt

This book was originally written as an introduction to the Survey of International Affairs in 1920-3, and was intended for publication as part of the same volume; but both parts grew in the making until it became necessary to divide them into the two separate volumes which are now being published simultaneously by the Oxford University Press. The number of important events which crowded the years covered by the Survey made the compression of that volume within the limits originally laid down an impossibility, while, at the same time, those responsible for the whole publication felt that Mr. Toynbee's introduction was far too valuable to the student of post-war history to be suppressed or even curtailed. Adrift on the vast and shifting sea of facts and allegations of which this period consists, the explorer needs some chart of the terra firma of previous history, from the--comparatively--fixed points of which he may take his bearings and establish his position. Such a chart the present volume will, it is hoped, be found to provide; but, like a chart, it is an independent piece of work, complete in itself, and capable, therefore, of being severed from the context with which it was originally associated.

While it is anticipated that most readers will not rest content with the introductory volume only, it is possible that some may be found whose ambitions go no farther than to desire a sound and impartial historical orientation in the troubled era in which they are compelled to live, and to such this comparatively short, but at the same time penetrating, review may be more welcome in its present form than as part of a larger, and, in the alternative shape, decidedly more unwieldy whole.

G. M. GATHORNE-HARDY.
Honorary Secretary, British Institute of International Affairs.

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