Sketches of Eighteenth Century America: More 'Letters from an American Farmer'

Sketches of Eighteenth Century America: More 'Letters from an American Farmer'

Sketches of Eighteenth Century America: More 'Letters from an American Farmer'

Sketches of Eighteenth Century America: More 'Letters from an American Farmer'

Excerpt

About the year 1759 or 1760, a young Frenchman came into the northern English colonies from Canada. At different times he seems to have been a surveyor in the region of Albany, a resident of Pennsylvania and of Ulster county in the province of New York. In Orange county he ultimately acquired a farm, "Pine Hill." About two months before the purchase of this, in 1769, he was married to Mehetable Tippet of Yonkers. So, for the time being at least, the wanderings of Hector St. John de Crèvecœur came to an end.

Behind this enthusiastic young farmer was an interesting story. He had been born near Caen, France, in 1735, the son of a well-bred country gentleman and of a mother who belonged to a family of distinction and who herself was educated beyond the usual woman of her time. When a young man, Crèvecœur, always in pursuit of new experiences, came out to New France. Here he joined the army and became a lieutenant under Montcalm in his battle for the preservation of the French Empire in America in the last great French and Indian war. His military duties seem to have sent him on a map-making expedition into the wilderness beyond the Great Lakes. He went to Detroit and turned southward through the forests to the Ohio River. He learned much of the valleys of the Scioto and the Muskingum and something of the habits and character of the powerful Indian tribes who lived south of Lake . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.