God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything

God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything

God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything

God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything

Synopsis

Christopher Hitchens has been hailed as one of the most brilliant journalists of our time' (London Observer). Here he makes the ultimate case against organised religion.

With a detailed reading of the major religious texts, he documents the ways in which religion is a man-made wish, a cause of dangerous sexual repression, and a distortion of our origins in the cosmos. Hitchens frames the argument for a more secular life based on science and reason, in which hell is replaced by the Hubble Telescope's awesome view of the universe, and Moses and the burning bush give way to the beauty and symmetry of the double helix.

With chapters entitled Religion Kills, The New' Testament Exceeds the Evil of the Old' One, The Koran is Borrowed from Both Jewish and Christian Myths, and Is Religion Child Abuse? Hitchens argues for a more secular life based on science and reason rather than the myths of a man-made wish.

Excerpt

If the intended reader of this book should want to go beyond disagreement with its author and try to identify the sins and deformities that animated him to write it (and I have certainly noticed that those who publicly affirm charity and compassion and forgiveness are often inclined to take this course), then he or she will not just be quarreling with the unknowable and ineffable creator who--presumably-- opted to make me this way. They will be defiling the memory of a good, sincere, simple woman, of stable and decent faith, named Mrs. Jean Watts. It was Mrs. Watts's task, when I was a boy of about nine and attending a school on the edge of Dartmoor, in southwestern England, to instruct me in lessons about nature, and also about scripture. She would take me and my fellows on walks, in an especially lovely part of my beautiful country of birth, and teach us to tell the different birds, trees, and plants from one another. The amazing variety to be found in a hedgerow; the wonder of a clutch of eggs found in an intricate nest; the way that if the nettles stung your legs (we had to wear shorts) there would be a soothing dock leaf planted near to hand: all this has stayed in my mind, just like the "gamekeeper's museum," where the local peasantry would display the corpses of rats, weasels, and other . . .

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