Introduction to Logical Theory

Introduction to Logical Theory

Introduction to Logical Theory

Introduction to Logical Theory

Excerpt

There are in existence many text-books and technical treatises on formal logic, and I have not sought in this book to add to their number. Many such books, excellent as they often are in their expositions of the technical and systematic aspects of logic, deal comparatively sketchily, and often rather misleadingly, with the relations between the formal systems they expound and the logical features of ordinary discourse. As a result of this omission, the true character of formal logic itself is apt to be left obscure. So this book has two complementary aims: one is to bring out some points of contrast and of contact between the behaviour of words in ordinary speech and the behaviour of symbols in a logical system; the other is to make clear, at an introductory level, the nature of formal logic itself. I have included enough of the elementary material of formal logic to provide a basis for the philosophical discussion of its nature, and to serve, if desired, as an introduction to more advanced technical treatises. Since the book is designed to be used as a general introduction to logic, I have added a concluding chapter on induction and probability.

I wish to acknowledge my great indebtedness to the many Oxford colleagues from whose discussions of the topics of this book I have profited; and among these, in particular, to Mr. H. P. Grice, from whom I have never ceased to learn about logic since he was my tutor in the subject; and to Professor Gilbert Ryle, Mr. G. A. Paul and Miss Ruby Meager, all of whom read the book either in manuscript or in proof and saved me from many inelegancies and mistakes.

P. F. S.

Oxford,
May, 1952.

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