Africa Unbound: Reflections of an African Statesman

Africa Unbound: Reflections of an African Statesman

Africa Unbound: Reflections of an African Statesman

Africa Unbound: Reflections of an African Statesman

Excerpt

Since my earliest school days in Ghana, when I discovered that I had a natural aptitude for politics, I have remained deeply interested in political science and international affairs. As a matter of fact, I became president of so many students' groups and associations, including a study circle in international affairs at Mfantsipim School, Cape Coast--and later at Achimota College, near Accra--that I was nicknamed the "young statesman" by my friends. At Exeter College, Oxford, where I read "modern greats," I continued my political education by taking an honors degree in philosophy, politics, and economics. In addition to my studies, I took part in the activities of the Oxford Union, and the opportunity of serving as the President of the West African Students Union at Oxford gave me an insight into world affairs and both a practical and a theoretical training that was to prove invaluable in the years to follow.

My interest in both national and international affairs, however, does not necessarily qualify me to write a book on any subject. But I have been emboldened to set down my ideas by the encouragement received from my wife, Elsie, and from Nana Kobina Nketsia, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Ghana and Cultural Adviser to the President of Ghana. Moreover, my own travels in Latin America, Europe, and Africa have served to convince me that in the outside world Africa has been the sub-

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