Some Problems of Philosophy: A Beginning of an Introduction to Philosophy

Some Problems of Philosophy: A Beginning of an Introduction to Philosophy

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Some Problems of Philosophy: A Beginning of an Introduction to Philosophy

Some Problems of Philosophy: A Beginning of an Introduction to Philosophy

Read FREE!

Synopsis

With the clarity that James deemed obligatory, Some Problems of Philosophy outlines his theory of perception. The early chapters expose the defects of intellectualism and monism and the advantages of empiricism and pluralism. The novelty that enters into concrete perceptual experience, and that is disallowed by the rationalizing intellect, suggests exciting possibilities. Denied any absolute truth in an ever-changing world, privy to only a piece of the truth at any given moment, the individual can, with faith and good will, help create order out of chaos. Some Problems in Philosophy, published posthumously, represents an important advance in William James's thought.

Excerpt

For several years before his death Professor William James cherished the purpose of stating his views on certain problems of metaphysics in a book addressed particularly to readers of philosophy. He began the actual writing of this 'introductory text-book for students in metaphysics,' as he once called it, in March, 1909, and to complete it was at last his dearest ambition. But illness, and other demands on his diminished strength, continued to interfere, and what is now published is all that he had succeeded in writing when he died in August, 1910.

Two typewritten copies of his unfinished manuscript were found. They had been corrected separately. A comparison of the independent alterations in the two copies showed few and slight differences of phrase and detail, and indicated no formed intention to make substantial changes; yet the author perhaps expected to make some further alterations in a final revision if he could finish the book, for in a memorandum dated July 26, 1910, in which he directed the publication of the manuscript, he wrote: 'Say it is fragmentary and unrevised.'

This memorandum continues, 'Call it "A begin . . .

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