Democracy Works

Democracy Works

Democracy Works

Democracy Works

Excerpt

The long, gray-shingled house snuggled into the fold of a hill above the water. Boats at anchor swayed under a golden moon, their riding lights flickering from the masts. We were sitting on the harbor-side porch, sipping coffee, watching the smoke from cigars and cigarettes float lazily upward. We were at peace with ourselves and with the dreaming world around us. A "Heartbreak House" setting put down on Long Island Sound with even the high humming of an airplane motor to make it more complete.

At first our talk was in the quiet mood of the evening itself; of the chances for a sailing breeze in the morning, of the affairs of friends, of the merits of the new play at the summer theatre near by.

And then of a sudden came a stentorian interruption. One of the youngsters had turned on the radio and come upon a speech of Hitler's. Over and over again, the rasping, hysterical voice screamed something to a thunderous accompaniment of "Hells!"

In one way or another, all of us were shaken out of our contentment by this blatant intrusion. But when someone nearest the living room suggested turning off the radio, our host stirred uneasily and said: "No, no, let's hear what he has to say. . . ."

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