Finite-Dimensional Vector Spaces

Finite-Dimensional Vector Spaces

Finite-Dimensional Vector Spaces

Finite-Dimensional Vector Spaces

Excerpt

My purpose in this book is to treat linear transformations on finite-dimensional vector spaces by the methods of more general theories. The idea is to emphasize the simple geometric notions common to many parts of mathematics and its applications, and to do so in a language that gives away the trade secrets and tells the student what is in the back of the minds of people proving theorems about integral equations and Hilbert spaces. The reader does not, however, have to share my prejudiced motivation. Except for an occasional reference to undergraduate mathematics the book is self-contained and may be read by anyone who is trying to get a feeling for the linear problem usually discussed in courses on matrix theory or "higher" algebra. The algebraic, coordinate-free methods do not lose power and elegance by specialization to a finite number of dimensions, and they are, in my belief, as elementary as the classical coordinatized treatment.

I originally intended this book to contain a theorem if and only if an infinite-dimensional generalization of it already exists. The tempting easiness of some essentially finite-dimensional notions and results was, however, irresistible, and in the final result my initial intentions are just barely visible. They are most clearly seen in the emphasis, throughout, on generalizable methods instead of sharpest possible results. The reader may sometimes see some obvious way of shortening the proofs I give. In such cases the chances are that the infinite-dimensional analogue of the shorter proof is either much longer or else non-existent.

A preliminary edition of the book (Annals of Mathematics Studies, Number 7, first published by the Princeton University Press in 1942) has been circulating for several years. In addition to some minor changes in style and in order, the difference between the preceding version and this one is that the latter contains the following new material: (1) A brief discussion of fields, and, in the treatment of vector spaces with inner products, special attention to the real case. (2) A definition of determinants in invariant terms, via the theory of multilinear forms. (3) Exercises.

The exercises (well over three hundred of them) constitute the most significant addition; I hope that they will be found useful by both student . . .

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