Clinical Interviews for Children and Adolescents: Assessment to Intervention

Clinical Interviews for Children and Adolescents: Assessment to Intervention

Clinical Interviews for Children and Adolescents: Assessment to Intervention

Clinical Interviews for Children and Adolescents: Assessment to Intervention

Synopsis

Crafted to meet the day-to-day needs of school psychologists and other practitioners working with children, this is the most concise, practical, and up-to-date book of its kind. The expert author offers guidelines for interviewing children of different ages - as well as their parents and teachers - and for weaving the resulting data into multi-method assessment and intervention planning. Coverage encompasses school issues, peer and family relations, problem behavior, and more, with special chapters on assessing suicidality and violence risks. The book includes many detailed case illustrations and reproducible interview tools, in a convenient large-size format with lay-flat binding.

Excerpt

Most people, when given the opportunity, love to talk about themselves. Children are no different. Yet, without even thinking, adults often hinder children from speaking for themselves. Ask a child a question in the presence of a parent or another familiar adult and watch what happens. As the child starts to speak, the adult jumps in to explain what the child thinks or feels, and then continues with his or her own view of the matter. Other times, when children do manage to express their views, adults counteract with their versions of how things should be or how children should think or feel. This is captured poignantly in Cat Stevens’s lament, “From the moment I could talk, I was ordered to listen …” (“Father and Sonfrom Tea for the Tillerman, released November 1970). in my practice as a psychologist and researcher, I have met many children like that son struggling to be heard. These are the ones we call “rebellious, oppositional, depressed, withdrawn, inattentive, shy, uncommunicative …” Add your own words.

Learning children’s viewpoints is an essential feature of good clinical assessment, especially assessment of children experiencing learning, behavioral, and emotional problems. I hope this book will enhance readers’ professional skills for hearing what troubled children have to say and integrating children’s perspectives with those of their parents, teachers, and other significant adults. To provide a broad focus, this book discusses clinical interviewing within the framework of multimethod assessment. Readers are encouraged to use other assessment methods along with clinical interviews to obtain comprehensive pictures of children’s functioning. To illustrate interviewing strategies, I have included case examples and interview segments based on research and clinical experience with many children. All of the names used in these cases are pseudonyms and details of case material have been altered to protect confidentiality.

In my research and the creation of this book, I have benefited from the help and advice of many colleagues. I am particularly grateful for the advice of Kenneth Merrell, editor of the Guilford Practical Intervention in the Schools Series, who encouraged me to write this book and provided valuable editorial comments. I am also grateful to Chris Jennison and the editorial staff at the Guilford Press for their efforts and support. I thank my colleague Thomas Achenbach, who has been a friend and my closest collaborator in over two decades of research on empirically based assessment of children’s emotional and behavioral problems. Our research to develop the Semistructured Clinical Interview for Children and Adolescents (SCICA; McConaughy & . . .

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