Emotion and Consciousness

Emotion and Consciousness

Emotion and Consciousness

Emotion and Consciousness

Synopsis

"What is the relationship between thinking and feeling? How do we become aware of our own and others' emotional responses? Questions like these are central to a growing body of research in a range of disciplines, yet the resulting ideas and findings often remain disparate. This volume assembles leading psychologists, neuroscientists, and philosophers to take stock of current knowledge on emotion and consciousness; identify key, cross-cutting themes; and bring a new level of coherence to ongoing work in the field. Synthesizing the breadth of current knowledge and establishing a cogent agenda for future research, this thought-provoking work belongs on the desks of social and personality psychologists, cognitive neuroscientists, and other researchers and students interested in emotions. It fills a unique niche as a supplemental text in graduate-level courses." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

The idea that emotion reflects a combination of conscious and unconscious processes dates back to the beginning of Western philosophy, when Plato and Aristotle noticed that some emotions, such as anger, can arise via careful deliberation (e.g., about injustice), via an impulsive reaction (e.g., to pain), or via a combination of both. Scientific interest in the role of consciousness in emotion was perhaps first stimulated by William James, who asserted that emotion is a conscious perception of bodily changes, which themselves can have unconscious origins. This interest in the interplay between conscious and unconscious contributions to emotional responding has reemerged in recent years, as scientists have placed the study of emotion at the center of scientific inquiry about the human condition, and as the study of consciousness has, again, become scientifically respectable. Fields with broadly differing epistemological frameworks (e.g., cultural anthropology, philosophy, psychology, cognitive science, and various forms of neuroscience) all study something called “emotion.” And, as emotion research in these fields progresses at many levels of analysis, questions about the relationship between emotion and consciousness remain at the center of the investigations (even if only to highlight that consciousness is not the defining feature of an emotional state). Questions about the interplay of emotion and consciousness have expanded from examining the place of conscious feelings in emotional responding to include related . . .

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