Juvenile Justice Sourcebook: Past, Present, and Future

Juvenile Justice Sourcebook: Past, Present, and Future

Juvenile Justice Sourcebook: Past, Present, and Future

Juvenile Justice Sourcebook: Past, Present, and Future

Synopsis

Several million reported and unreported delinquent acts take place each year. In fact, according to the U. S. Department of Justice and the U. S. Bureau of Justice Statistics, juvenile delinquency, acting-out and oppositional behavior, illegal drugs, guns, and youth violence are pervasive throughout American society. Juvenile Justice Sourcebook is the first comprehensive volume devoted exclusively to the biopsychosocial assessment, police and juvenile court processing, and institutional and community-based treatment and rehabilitation of juvenile offenders. The overriding objective of this sourcebook is to trace the tremendous progress achieved toward resolving juvenile justice issues, dilemmas, and controversies, while providing futuristic visions for the juvenile justice field. Each chapter, authored by preeminent expert practitioners and researchers, explores topics ranging from innovative counseling and multisystemic programs, to restorative justice, to rehabilitation programs such as aggression replacement training, wilderness programs, family treatment, substance abuse treatment, restitution, and aftercare. This volume, grounded in history and exhaustive research, presents the latest evidence-based policies, programs, and innovative treatment alternatives. Examining the entire juvenile justice system, including juvenile law, policies, practices, and research, the Juvenile Justice Sourcebook will be invaluable to all juvenile justice practitioners, policy analysts, researchers, and students. This book has ten special features: 1. It provides a comprehensive discussion of the critical issues, controversies, public policies, and intervention strategies and programs of the juvenile justice system. 2. It features up-to-date and poignant case studies to illustrate and profile juvenile drug dealers, murderers, burglars, mentally ill offenders, auto thieves, violent gang members, runaways, and youths growing up in violent homes. 3. It presents the latest information on prevalence trends and juvenile justice processing and decision-making from arrest to intake, prosecution, adjudication, and case disposition. 4. It features the latest research evidence that indicates that putting juvenile offenders into adult jails and secure juvenile institutions leads many juveniles into committing more serious and violent crimes upon release. 5. It presents the latest longitudinal research evidence on the 10 model programs most likely to reduce recidivism. 6. It provides the latest descriptive information on the types, functions, and legal responsibilities of the various juvenile justice agencies and institutions. 7. It contains a complete discussion ont he landmark U. S. Supreme Court cases on the legal rights of juveniles, including death penalty cases of the past and predictions for the year 2,020. 8. It provides an extensive discussion of the strengths and limitations of institutions, residential treatment centers, group homes, probabtion, family counseling, structured wilderness programs, vocational training programs; and conflict resolution programs in schools, skill-based programs in juvenile detention, group therapy with mentally ill and substance abusing juveniles; and restitution, electronic monitoring, and victim offender mediation programs in probation settings. 9. It includes a detailed glossary of key terms and definitions. 10. It contains 15 photographs.

Excerpt

Like many individuals—informed citizens, legislators, attorneys, police officers, judges, librarians, and juvenile justice professionals—I have been fascinated, frustrated, and challenged by the agencies and institutions that constitute the juvenile justice system. My journey started early when at age 16, I had a minor brush with the law, which left a lasting impression. While driving in New York City, I was arrested and placed in an adult detention facility for several hours for speeding and driving with a junior license (i.e., the bearer of a junior license was prohibited from driving within New York City limits until completing a driver education course and being 17 years of age). I was driving my older brother’s car, but the police stopped me because my brother’s car was allegedly the same make and color of someone else’s car that had been stolen. Fortunately, my father hired an excellent attorney to defend me and I was given a suspended sentence.

The impetus for this book grows out of my research projects, program evaluations of juvenile offender treatment programs, and teaching of juvenile justice and juvenile delinquency over the past 30 years. The decision to write and edit this book was based on my belief that an up-to-date text was needed by upper-division undergraduate and graduate students majoring in criminology and criminal justice that addressed juvenile justice trends, critical issues, policies, programs, and research. This volume should also prove useful to practitioners and administrators both as a desktop reference and as a resource for updating their knowledge about the most effective interventions and practices with juvenile offenders. Early in my career, after being awarded my Master’s degree in Sociology and Criminology, and before obtaining my doctorate and embarking on my teaching career, I had worked for the Maryland Department of Correctional Services as a Management and Research Analyst. Then, during the second half of the 1970s, I had completed a national study of instructional technology in youth and adult correctional institutions throughout the United States under a Law Enforcement Assistance Administration (L.E.A.A.) federal grant to the American Correctional Association. As principal investigator of this research project, I had the opportunity to visit and evaluate prison schools in Arkansas, Connecticut, Florida, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, and Texas. Prior to the national survey I was a consultant to the U.S. Office of Education Teacher Corps in Corrections . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.