Brain Matters: Translating Research into Classroom Practice

Brain Matters: Translating Research into Classroom Practice

Brain Matters: Translating Research into Classroom Practice

Brain Matters: Translating Research into Classroom Practice

Excerpt

Some scientists and educators think it is too soon to apply brain research to the classroom, because we don't know enough yet. The field is so new, they say, and the discoveries in many cases so narrow in their focus, that we run the risk of making false assumptions and perhaps even dangerous applications.

On the one hand, their caution is warranted. Educators have a history of jumping on bandwagons, and they often have accepted unproven theories as fact and have applied strategies without careful analysis of their effectiveness. There is still a great deal we do not know about how the human brain functions. Neuroscience research is in its infancy, and new studies often refute the previous month's findings.

On the other hand, it would be foolish to wait until all the research is in and we have absolute certainty before beginning our study of the brain and discussing the possible implications and applications of research findings. Much of the research already confirms what experienced educators have long known and used in their classrooms. What the research adds, at this point, is a partial understanding of why certain procedures or strategies work. As a result, we no longer have to operate intuitively but can begin to articulate and explain the rationale for . . .

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