The Naked Clone: How Cloning Bans Threaten Our Personal Rights

The Naked Clone: How Cloning Bans Threaten Our Personal Rights

The Naked Clone: How Cloning Bans Threaten Our Personal Rights

The Naked Clone: How Cloning Bans Threaten Our Personal Rights

Synopsis

Kunich establishes the pressing need to evaluate cloning in a rational scientific and legal manner, before unsound opposition results in an unconstitutional federal ban.

Excerpt

Every human being has legal rights. These rights do not depend on whether a person came to be through in vitro fertilization, artificial insemination—or cloning.

Human cloning is inevitable, and the law must adjust. The title of this book, The Naked Clone, highlights how far off the mark the legal debate on cloning has been. The widespread public horror that has greeted the dawning of mammalian cloning is being translated into laws, and often outright bans, on the cloning of human beings, particularly reproductive cloning (cloning to produce children). Children will not be born at all because of these bans, and potential parents will be denied the children they could have had. The very processes that could have enabled these children to be born are criminalized and outlawed. The child of cloning— often inaccurately and callously called a “clone”—is therefore rendered naked and alone, in the legal sense. No laws shelter this child who will never be born. No laws cover this child with their protective shield and enable him or her to begin life. And the hopeful parents of this child are left similarly bereft.

The naked clone situation is happening right now. Within the United States, six states have enacted bans on human cloning in some form, and many more are considering it. The United States Congress has come close to enacting a permanent, sweeping ban on both reproductive cloning and therapeutic/research cloning, with the enthusiastic support and encouragement of President George W. Bush. Numerous other nations have already passed their own bans of various types, including the United Kingdom, Germany, Japan, Israel, Spain, Australia, Denmark, New Zealand . . .

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