To Make the Wounded Whole: The Cultural Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr.

To Make the Wounded Whole: The Cultural Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr.

To Make the Wounded Whole: The Cultural Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr.

To Make the Wounded Whole: The Cultural Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Synopsis

To Make the Wounded Whole describes how King's black messianic vision propelled him into fateful encounters with other black leaders, the war in Vietnam, black theology and world liberation movements.

Excerpt

This book is largely the product of a collective effort. It was brought to completion with the support and encouragement of many scholars, librarians, archivists, students, and friends. These persons are too numerous to name individually, but I cannot resist the need to recognize some of them.

I owe an enormous intellectual debt to Professor James H. Cone of Union Theological Seminary in New York. Dr. Cone willingly shared the products of his own research on Martin Luther King, Jr., with me, and we exchanged ideas that stimulated my thinking and helped me to conceptualize this work. Although Dr. Cone and I have not always agreed in our perceptions of King’s life, thought, and legacy, we have nevertheless made each other’s work pleasant and richer. I share with him the wish to preserve King’s life and legacy from the fate of obscurity and of misunderstanding that often befalls great black men and women.

Dr. Sterling Stuckey, a former teacher at Northwestern University, influenced this study in profound ways. I have benefited immensely from Dr. Stuckey’s treatments of black nationalist theory, particularly as they relate to the ties between African-Americans and Africans. Dr. Stuckey has always shown interest in and support for my work.

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