The Delinquent Girl

The Delinquent Girl

The Delinquent Girl

The Delinquent Girl

Synopsis

Over the past decade and a half, girls' involvement in the juvenile justice system has increased. Yet the topic remains under-studied among criminologists. The Delinquent Girl is a "state-of-the-field" evaluation that identifies and analyzes girls who become delinquent, the kinds of crimes they commit and the reasons they commit them. The distinguished academics and practitioners who contributed to this volume provide an overview of the research on girls' delinquency, discuss policy implications and point to areas where further research is critically needed.

Excerpt

With some exceptions, extensive recent scholarship focusing on gender and crime has tended to concentrate on women, not on girls. Longitudinal studies have been conducted with great impact on fields of knowledge; however, most of these, also, did not focus on girls (for example, Farrington 1994; Loeber, Keenan, and Zhang 1997; Thornberry and Krohn 2005). Moffitt and others (2001) and Widom (1995) are notable exceptions. In addition, while existing treatises have provided important windows into girls' involvement in delinquency (see, for example, ChesneyLind and Pasko 2004), no comprehensive review exists of empirical evidence for the causes and correlates of girls' delinquency.

Over the past decade and a half, girls' involvement in the juvenile justice system has increased. It is estimated that there were over 640,000 arrests of females under eighteen in 2006. Arrests were most common for minor crimes, particularly larceny-theft, simple assault, disorderly conduct, and running away from home. A substantial number of girls, however, were arrested for more serious offenses, such as aggravated assault and burglary. Self-report surveys of juveniles suggest that the extent of female offending is much higher. According to the 2006 Monitoring the Future survey, for example, 26 percent of female high school students reported involvement in shoplifting, while 32 percent admitted to some sort of theft, and 15 percent reported having been involved in a gang fight (Lloyd et al. 2007). Further, some data suggest that girls' delinquency is increasing faster than boys' delinquency (although see the discussion of this idea in Chapter 3). In 1980, girls . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.