Corpus Linguistics

Corpus Linguistics

Corpus Linguistics

Corpus Linguistics

Synopsis

Corpus Linguistics has quickly established itself as the leading undergraduate course book in the subject. This second edition takes full account of the latest developments in this rapidly changing field, making this book the most up-to-date and comprehensive textbook available. It gives a step-by-step introduction to what a corpus is, how corpora are constructed, and what can be done with them.

Excerpt

Corpus linguistics has undergone a remarkable renaissance in recent years. From being a marginalised approach used largely in English linguistics, and more specifically in studies of English grammar, corpus linguistics has started to widen its scope. As will be shown in the book, corpus linguistics is a lively subject, with corpus-based approaches being taken to many research questions in linguistics. Corpus linguistics is also increasingly multilingual, with many languages, and many varieties of those languages, being studied with the help of corpus data. But, before we venture to discuss this wide scope, we need to address the most basic question of all: what is corpus linguistics?

Corpus linguistics is perhaps best described for the moment in simple terms as the study of language based on examples of'real life' language use. It has a long and interesting history. Yet the term corpus linguistics is a relatively modern term. This chapter examines how this modern phenomenon, corpus linguistics, has come to be an increasingly prevalent methodology in linguistics, in spite of the unpopularity of the approach in the 1960s and 1970s.

A staggering number of myths surround corpus linguistics. When we consider that it is nothing but a methodology, it is surprising to observe the heated debates it has caused. the history of corpus linguistics exists almost as a body of academic folklore. Nearly any linguist will be able to cite parts of this body of anecdotal knowledge, for example,'More people live in New York than Dayton Ohio','Corpus linguists study real language, other linguists just sit at their coffee table and think of wild and impossible sentences', Ά corpus can't describe a natural language entirely' and 'Natural language is infinite.'All of these statements express twisted, partial views of linguistic methodology. Some contain mis-truths and exaggeration. Some put forward dislocated facts as irrefutable evidence. All are only part of a rich and fascinating topic - the history of corpus linguistics. This chapter will seek to dispel myths and collect together often fragmented pieces of evidence to reconstruct a coherent view of corpus linguistics. the aim is for an understanding of the topic framed in an . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.