Historical Dictionary of American Education

Historical Dictionary of American Education

Historical Dictionary of American Education

Historical Dictionary of American Education

Excerpt

History touches all fields of education. This encompasses cognate areas as well as basic elements like school architecture, the Pledge of Allegiance, and school law. This dictionary attempts to be as inclusive as possible. It provides factual information about eminent people and important topics related to the development of American public, private, and parochial schools, covering elementary and secondary levels. In addition to major state and regional school leaders and reformers, it includes the biographies of significant national educators, philosophers, psychologists, and writers, but not necessarily limited to deceased notables. Subjects embrace significant ideas, events, institutions, agencies, and pedagogical trends that profoundly shaped this society's changing perceptions and policies regarding education. Although some items, like normal schools, cause slight overlap with higher education's philosophies and institutions, such treatments concentrate on the elementary and secondary context. Much of this factual knowledge is not unlike that in many history of education textbooks, but without contextual information and chronological structure. Further, these people and topics receive more than passing comments; albeit brief, the information is detailed enough to give the reader adequate background and a few bibliographical leads. This dictionary also contains a selected bibliography of additional educational history sources.

I attempted to rely on a methodical process to compile this list, utilizing a three-step approach. First, I stripped the indexes of leading history of education textbooks and reviewed thirty years of back issues of the History of Education Quarterly. Second, I sent this preliminary list to the dictionary's Advisory Committee for additions, deletions, and revisions. Their comments and suggestions greatly refined this list. Third, I accepted recommendations from authors as the articles arrived over a period of seven years. This whole project became organic, growing, changing, evolving. No matter what process I utilized, however, this project represents a no-win situation. Critics, I anticipate, will complain that I

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