Gods of Our Fathers: The Memory of Egypt in Judaism and Christianity

Gods of Our Fathers: The Memory of Egypt in Judaism and Christianity

Gods of Our Fathers: The Memory of Egypt in Judaism and Christianity

Gods of Our Fathers: The Memory of Egypt in Judaism and Christianity

Synopsis

"A new look at Judaism and Christianity by which Gabriel attempts to trace their historical theological roots, not to the revelations of God, but to the common theological ancestor: the religions of ancient Egypt. Using new material only recently made available by archaeology, Gabriel shows how the theological premises of Christianity were in existence three thousand years before Christ and how the heresy of Akhenaten became the source for Moses' Judaism." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

There is great enjoyment in following the reasoning of an outstanding analytical mind offering solutions to complex matters that are frequendy clouded by the minutiae of detail and controversial arguments marshaled by the “experts.” Dr. Gabriel's book enables the interested reader to rise above the complex discussion between opposing schools of thought and grasp an understanding of important problems that are fascinating and vital for the genesis of two of the three main pillars of western culture: Judaism and Christianity.

From the early twentieth century onward, a few scholars have hinted at Judeo-Christianity's indebtedness to Pharaonic Egypt for the creation of monotheism and ethics, without denying the influence of Greek thought, the third of the above pillars. It is, however, only in this book, designed to familiarize the non-expert with the full impact of ancient Egyptian thinking on the western theological and ethical tradition, that one finds the long-overdue and strongly argued case that pays a debt of honor to the thoughts and ideas conceived in the Nile valley long before Moses, the Exodus, Christ, and the crucifixion.

Because of this important contribution, I thought it incumbent upon me to accept Professor Gabriel's request to add some ideas and remarks to his delightful and stimulating new book. His explicit request was addressed to me in my capacity as an archaeologist. But making stones speak, saxa loquitur, and answering the question put by Joshua (5.21) into the mouths of future generations, “what mean those stones?,” necessitates comprehensive interpretations . . .

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