Clinical Neuropsychology

Clinical Neuropsychology

Clinical Neuropsychology

Clinical Neuropsychology

Synopsis

Clinical Neuropsychology comprehensively reviews the major neurobehavioral disorders associated with brain dysfunction. Since the third edition appeared in 1993 there have been many advances in the understanding and treatment of neurobehavioral disorders. This edition, like prior editions,describes the classical signs and symptoms associated with the major behavioral disorders such as aphasia, agraphia, alexia, amnesia, apraxia, neglect, executive disorders and dementia. It also discusses advances in assessing, diagnosing and treating these disorders and it addresses the brainmechanisms underlying these deficits. A multi-authored text has the advantage of having authorities write about the disorders in which they have expertise. The fourth edition adds new authors and five entirely new chapters on phonologic aspects of language disorders, syntactic aspects of languagedisorders, lexical-semantic aspects of language disorders, anosognosia, hallucinations and related conditions. This is the most comprehensive edition of this text to date. It will be of value to clinicians, investigators, and students from a variety of disciplines, including neurology, psychology, cognitive neuroscience, psychiatry, and speech pathology.

Excerpt

This fourth edition of Clinical Neuropsychology, like all the former editions, focuses on the clinical presentation of the major neurobehavioral syndromes. It has been 9 years since the last edition was published and while the major syndromes have remained the same, much has been learned about them. As in prior editions the authors have included clinical descriptions and have addressed neuropsychological mechanisms that might account for these disorders, brain pathology associated with these disorders, and when possible aspects of therapy and management. In our effort to be comprehensive and include the advances that have occurred since our last edition, each of the chapters has been updated and enlarged. We also added chapters on anosognosia and on hallucinations. We deleted the chapter on schizophrenia, because we did not have space in the book to include discussion of the many other psychiatric disorders with neuropsychological deficits, and including only one created an unbalanced view. The chapter on recovery of function has been supplemented by a chapter on pharmacotherapy.

When we first considered editing this book, Arthur Benton was very supportive and put us in touch with Jeffrey House at Oxford University Press. After the first edition was published, some people complained about the title because we (K.M.H. and E.V.) were neurologists, not neuropsychologists. It was actually Arthur who suggested this title and when we told him about these complaints, after he stopped laughing, he said that neuropsychology is both a profession and a discipline and that a book which describes the major neurobehavioral disorders was certainly about the discipline of clinical neuropsychology. Arthur was the primary author of two chapters in each of our three prior editions, Disorders of the Body Schema, and Visuoperceptual, Visuospatial and Visuoconstructive Disorders. Arthur has retired, and we have replaced his chapters (and the separate chapter on acalculia) by chapters on visual-spatial perception and cognition, and the other on acalculia and disorders of the body schema.

We were saddened by the death of D. Frank Benson, who was a fine person and one of the leaders of American behavioral and cognitive neurology. Frank had contributed the chapter on aphasia for our three prior editions. His chapter pri-

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