Return to Diversity: A Political History of East Central Europe since World War II

Return to Diversity: A Political History of East Central Europe since World War II

Return to Diversity: A Political History of East Central Europe since World War II

Return to Diversity: A Political History of East Central Europe since World War II

Synopsis

"Most historians pinpoint Moses Mendelssohn's intellectual revolution in Germany during the second half of the eighteenth century as the decisive event that spawned Jewish modernity in the West. Todd M. Endelman takes issue with this Germanocentric orientation, however, counterarguing that the modernization of European Jewry encompassed far more than an intellectual revolution. By concentrating on the actual social and religious behavior of English Jews, Endelman demonstrates that the acculturation of Anglo-Jewry during the Georgian period moved at a more rapid pace than elsewhere in Europe. This was due largely to a constellation of political, social, and religious developments that set England apart from the rest of Europe in the eighteenth century. As such, Anglo-Jewry as a whole enjoyed a degree of toleration not to be found on the Continent." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

In his preface to the second edition of Return to Diversity, Joseph Rothschild envisioned a book on postcommunist East Central Europe to complete a trilogy on the modern history of the region. These plans, however, have fallen victim to his failing health. Because Return to Diversity continues to stand up well to the test of time, Oxford University Press has chosen to publish a third edition. In this edition, I have occasionally updated earlier chapters of the book, and there has been some analytical reinterpretation in Chapter 7, “The Various Endgames.” A new chapter, “The Postcommunist Era,” replaces the Epilogue of the second edition. It examines the problems of political transition from Communism in the decade since 1989. In addition, I have significantly expanded the Suggested Readings to include some of the important new research on the region. This wealth of recent publications reflects the increased interest in East Central Europe since the fall of Communism.

It is a pleasure to recognize the people who have helped me prepare the third edition of Return to Diversity. Melissa Bokovoy, Maria Bucur, David Crowe, Istv00E1n De00E1k, Rick Frucht, Christine Holden, Charlie Ingrao, Mills Kelly, Padraic Kenney, Jim Niessen, Peter Mentzel, Nick Miller, Elaine Spencer, and Teresa Tickle. I would also like to thank Todd Huebner for designing the maps and Stacie Caminos and Gioia Stevens, my editors at Oxford, for their advice.

DeKalb, Illinois   N. M. W.

February 1999 . . .

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