Reshaping National Intelligence for an Age of Information

Reshaping National Intelligence for an Age of Information

Reshaping National Intelligence for an Age of Information

Reshaping National Intelligence for an Age of Information

Synopsis

In a bold and penetrating study, Gregory Treverton, former Vice Chair of the National Intelligence Council and Senate investigator, offers his insider's views on how intelligence gathering and analysis must change. Treverton suggests why intelligence needs to be contrarian and attentive to the longer term. Believing that it is important to tap expertise outside government to solve intelligence problems, he argues that involving colleagues in the academy, think tanks, and Wall Street befits the changed role of government from doer to convener, mediator, and coalition-builder. Hb ISBN (2001): 0-521-58096-X

Excerpt

This book is a happy collaboration between RAND and the Twentieth Century Fund, now The Century Foundation. In fact, it became a tripartite collaboration, including Cambridge University Press, with which RAND inaugurated a new book series of policy analyses, a series edited by Charles Wolf, Jr., just as Greg Treverton joined RAND. Greg had left the vice chair of the National Intelligence Council during the Clinton administration to come to RAND to run the International Security and Defense Policy Center. At the same time, he joined a Twentieth Century Fund task force on intelligence that produced a report several years ago, In From the Cold. Greg contributed a background paper to that report, a paper that began to develop the issues treated in this book, and he played a major role in pushing the report to conclusion.

Our premise in this collaboration is the same as Greg's: Not only has the world of American intelligence been upended by the end of the Cold War, but the necessary reshaping of intelligence will itself have to result from a more open discussion of it than has been the norm in the American democracy. RAND and The Century Foundation share an interest in that reshaping of intelligence as an important part of America's capacity in foreign affairs. For RAND, U.S. intelligence is a client and an increasingly important one. As intelligence strives to adapt to a changed world, a range of RAND capacities — from regional analysis, to budgeting and manpower planning, to thinking about costly systems against an uncertain future — is more and more relevant. For its part, The Century Foundation's task force on intelligence followed an earlier one, focused on the question of covert action. The Foundation continues to foster discussion of the adequacy of current governmental arrangements in light of the changed world, and intelligence is an important part of those arrangements.

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