Democracy in Developing Countries

Democracy in Developing Countries

Democracy in Developing Countries

Democracy in Developing Countries

Synopsis

This text reflects improvements in democratic trends and the erosion of democratic advances in different countries. It regards political actors and institutions, and is concerned about the impact on democratic consolidation of economic constraints, weak states, judicial inefficacy and inequality.

Excerpt

This second edition of our book has been produced at a very different moment in the life cycle of democracy in Latin America and the world. When our project began in the mid-1980s with a conference on twenty-six developing countries, the “third wave” of global democratization had not yet been named or clearly identified, and the return of democracy to Latin America was still somewhat new and uncertain. This extensively revised collection appears exactly ten years after the first, and much has changed over the past decade. What is most important, however, is what has not changed: ten years later, none of our cases of democracy in Latin America has yet broken down—though Peru suffered a serious interruption in the early to mid-1990s and at most only a partial reequilibration. And our only case of a nondemocracy, Mexico, is now moving toward a genuine electoral democracy.

The story of the past ten years, however, is not only one of progress. As we document in our introduction, and as is apparent from many of the chapters, a number of our country cases have struggled with serious problems of democratic decay and malfunctioning, including human rights abuses and the resurgence of undemocratic styles of politics and governance. We felt that this remarkable record of progress and decay required serious empirical treatment and analytical and theoretical reflection.

We do not attempt here to recapitulate the intellectual history of comparative democratic studies, or of the project that produced the three original volumes on Africa, Asia, and Latin America, as well as two comparative collections. For that, we refer the reader back to the longer preface in the original volume on Latin America, which also discusses the comparative logic and case selection of that twenty-six-country project. Rather, here we want to explain the structure of our case study chapters and to offer . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.