International Handbook of Social Anxiety: Concepts, Research, and Interventions Relating to the Self and Shyness

International Handbook of Social Anxiety: Concepts, Research, and Interventions Relating to the Self and Shyness

International Handbook of Social Anxiety: Concepts, Research, and Interventions Relating to the Self and Shyness

International Handbook of Social Anxiety: Concepts, Research, and Interventions Relating to the Self and Shyness

Synopsis

This Handbook offers comprehensive coverage of current knowledge and recent advances with major sections on the origin and development of shyness and social anxiety, on social and personality factors, and on clinical perspectives and interventions.

The editors have drawn together some of the worlds leading international experts from diverse disciplines offering a critical focus on knowledge that is research-based, central to the understanding of social anxiety, and of essential interest to a wide range of students, researchers and professionals.

? A state-of-the-art account of knowledge in this field
? Contributions by leading academics, researchers, and clinicians
? Comprehensive coverage of the field representing different theoretical and clinical approaches
? Focused on key research and critical concepts

Excerpt

The considerable amount of attention that is currently paid to shyness in the child development literature owes much to the significant programme of longitudinal research into the temperamental category of behavioural inhibition undertaken by Jerome Kagan and his associates at Harvard. In itself, this programme has yielded considerable insights into the origins and development of shyness. In addition, it has stimulated important research in other laboratories, for example, by Fox and his colleagues at Maryland (see Chapter 2) and Stevenson-Hinde and her co-workers at Madingley, Cambridge, in the United Kingdom (see Chapter 3). However, other research traditions within developmental psychology have also contributed to our understanding of shyness and social anxiety. In this brief introduction to Section One we consider some of these contributions and also draw attention to links that are currently being made between them and the temperamental approach. These include: links with attachment theory (Marshall & Stevenson-Hinde, Chapter 3; Burgess et al., Chapter 7), styles of parenting (Schmidt et al., Chapter 3; Burgess et al., Chapter 7; Evans, Chapter 8); cognitive development (Lewis, Chapter 5; Yuill & Banerjee, Chapter 7); emotional development (Reddy, Chapter 4; Lewis, Chapter 5).

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