Organizing for High Performance: Employee Involvement, TQM, Reengineering, and Knowledge Management in the Fortune 1000: The CEO Report

Organizing for High Performance: Employee Involvement, TQM, Reengineering, and Knowledge Management in the Fortune 1000: The CEO Report

Organizing for High Performance: Employee Involvement, TQM, Reengineering, and Knowledge Management in the Fortune 1000: The CEO Report

Organizing for High Performance: Employee Involvement, TQM, Reengineering, and Knowledge Management in the Fortune 1000: The CEO Report

Synopsis

First published in 1998, Strategies for High Performance Organizations gave executives their first comprehensive look at how well the most popular improvement programs of the day were actually working throughout the Fortune 1000. Now, three years later, this latest edition updates those findings for today's business world and reviews some new developments as well. Like its predecessor, this edition distills a library's worth of research into an easy-to-interpret, jargon-free presentation. It examines the various employee involvement, TQM, and reengineering efforts embraced by leading corporations over the years, explains how they were managed, and tells which worked, which did not, and why. Trends and patterns in the newly emerging fields of knowledge management and e-commerce are also presented for the first time. Readers can expect a goldmine of information that they can use to benchmark their own programs, to determine if a program is right for their organization, and to set new strategies for the future. Includes a CD-ROM containing all the informative charts and graphs found in the book.

Excerpt

Global competition, the explosion of the Internet, and rapid economic changes are among the many forces that challenge traditional approaches to management. There is no shortage of new ideas about how organizations should be managed in order to allow them to gain a competitive advantage in today's hypercompetitive markets. During the 1990s, employee involvement (EI), total quality management (TQM), and process reengineering were among the most frequently mentioned and used approaches to improving organizational effectiveness. Currently, organizations are placing increased emphasis on knowledge management and the Internet to achieve that end. Two questions are key with respect to any effort to improve organizational effectiveness: Does it work? and What is involved in introducing it in a complex organization?

Our interest in employee involvement dates back decades and includes considerable research and consulting. Nevertheless, despite great interest in the topic and much research, little systematic information exists on why companies are adopting EI programs, what types of practices they are using, whether the use of EI is increasing or decreasing, how effective companies think EI is, and how effective it actually is.

Much the same is true for total quality management. In many organizations, TQM is closely related to EI; studying one without the other is ill advised. Reengineering is newer still; consequently, less research has been done on it. It is increasingly part of organizational change efforts that install extensive corporate information systems, in most cases enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems, and adopt Internet-based information systems.

Knowledge management has recently become a critical issue in organizations, for a number of reasons. Perhaps the most important is an increase in the number of organizations in developed countries that are doing knowledge work. Further, in many instances, the development and distribution of knowledge is one of the major factors in organizational effectiveness. Because so little research has been conducted on knowledge management practices, it is important that we start to track the kinds of practices organizations use to manage knowledge and to determine their effectiveness.

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