Leadership: The Inner Side of Greatness: A Philosophy for Leaders

Leadership: The Inner Side of Greatness: A Philosophy for Leaders

Leadership: The Inner Side of Greatness: A Philosophy for Leaders

Leadership: The Inner Side of Greatness: A Philosophy for Leaders

Synopsis

It has been more than a decade since the first edition of Peter Koestenbaum's landmark book Leadership: The Inner Side of Greatness was published. Since that time world events have caused a dramatic shift in how we think about our lives and our work. Now we grapple with the fundamental questions. How can we live a courageous life and manage anxiety? Is it possible to reach greater heights of ethics and responsibility?

Peter Koestenbaum, the preeminent business philosopher, has been a trusted mentor to business leaders worldwide. In this thoroughly revised edition of his classic book he shares his wisdom about the fundamental nature of leadership and shows what it takes to become an exceptional and passionate leader in today's complex world. At the very heart of the book is his Leadership Diamond model-a paradigm that challenges managers to transform their thinking and approach everything with fresh effectiveness in order to reap richer results and become great leaders.

Excerpt

Interest in philosophy in business has grown since Leadership: The Inner Side of Greatness appeared a decade ago. People seem to have appreciated its intention to be deep, looking into the center of the psyche and enriching themselves with substantial doses of selfdiscovery. These concerns have accelerated since the events of September 11, 2001.

Recent polls indicate that at least one-third of the population say they have made significant lifestyle changes as a result of 9/11. Many of these changes are steps away from work and toward the family. Also, people have become significantly more reflective and introspective, showing more interest in spirituality at work. These people are more congenial now to the spirit of camaraderie than to competition. You may find it harder to “want to kill the competition” if the competition literally died in the World Trade Center. A lifestyle change is no longer purely a business decision but one of personal values. It is not done for profit but for the experience. Depth requires courage and risk of a kind different from what is required by investing, changing jobs, and analyzing the financials of an acquisition or a merger. Your issues become more than monetary calculations. They now demand that you deal with evil and death, with how to summon courage and manage anxiety, and how to reach greater heights of ethics and responsibility. This is the meaning of depth. And it is desired today more than ever in relation to work and business.

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