Stalking and Psychosexual Obsession: Psychological Perspectives for Prevention, Policing, and Treatment

Stalking and Psychosexual Obsession: Psychological Perspectives for Prevention, Policing, and Treatment

Stalking and Psychosexual Obsession: Psychological Perspectives for Prevention, Policing, and Treatment

Stalking and Psychosexual Obsession: Psychological Perspectives for Prevention, Policing, and Treatment

Synopsis

The recent increased focus on high profile stalking cases has led to the raising of public awareness and professional concern, however, only recently has there been substantial scientific research into the area.

Stalking and Psychosexual Obsession represents a showcase of contemporary research and theory never before assembled in one book. The contributions which are drawn from the diverse spheres of psychology, psychiatry, the police and the law provide a comprehensive picture of what is currently known about stalking.

Each of the chapters not only takes stock of existing research, but provides ground-breaking new insights. Among the topics covered are victimology, violence risk assessment and case management issues and a new stalker classificatory system is presented which offers advice on how to identify different types of stalkers with different intervention strategies being suggested for each case.

• A comprehensive, global showcase of contemporary thought, ideas, research and practice

• An international team of expert contributors from diverse backgrounds, including, psychology, psychiatry, police and the law

Excerpt

The Wiley Series on the Psychology of Crime, Policing and the Law publishes integrative reviews of important emerging areas of contemporary research. The purpose of the series is not merely to present research findings in a clear and readable form, but also to bring out their implications for both practice and policy. In this way, it is hoped that the series will not only be useful to psychologists, but also to all those concerned with crime detection and prevention, policing and the judicial process.

As the editors of the current volume remind us, the legal recognition of stalking—systematic harassment and intimidation directed at one individual by another—has only recently been recognised as a distinct form of criminality. One of the important features of stalking as a crime is that its appearance sometimes presages even more serious criminal acts against the victim, including physical violence and murder. For instance in September 2001, a former British naval officer, Anthony Hurdle, was sentenced to life imprisonment for attempted murder. His partner at the time had broken off her relationship with him after discovering that he had a history of stalking offences against other women. She in turn was then stalked by Hurdle for several months before suffering a horrific attack at his hands in her own home. Predicting when such escalation will occur and how to snuff out the behaviour before it takes place is a challenge to all forensic psychologists and psychiatrists, police officers, lawyers and criminologists who are drawn to this problem.

Stalking and Psychosexual Obsession: Psychological Perspectives for Prevention, Policing and Treatment provides the first comprehensive treatment of the topic, examining not simply the prevalence of stalking and the nature of the stalkers themselves, but also what can be done, through police action and the courts, to combat the activity in its many forms. Sadly, governments have often legislated in haste, without a full appreciation of the range of activities undertaken by stalkers or the scope of the problem. Likewise, beyond sensationalised accounts of individuals who have stalked celebrities, little is known about the personality and background of the men and women who become stalkers. This important book also looks . . .

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