Logistics and the Extended Enterprise: Benchmarks and Best Practices for the Manufacturing Professional

Logistics and the Extended Enterprise: Benchmarks and Best Practices for the Manufacturing Professional

Logistics and the Extended Enterprise: Benchmarks and Best Practices for the Manufacturing Professional

Logistics and the Extended Enterprise: Benchmarks and Best Practices for the Manufacturing Professional

Synopsis

Logistics and the Extended Enterprise is the result of a four-year, $1 million research project devoted to the study of best practices in supply chain management-a necessity for companies that want to be competitive in a global business environment. Written by members of the University of Maryland's Supply Chain Management Center, this important book takes a first-of-its-kind look at supply chain and logistics/transportation management organization structure. It offers a paradigm for successfully implementing a global supply chain and explains the role logistics plays in enabling this approach. The book answers the question of how organizations can best apply supply chain management practices to break down internal and external walls and become more effective extended enterprises, with a focus on lessons learned at some of the world's leading corporations. The authors gained first-hand insights into this subject through interviews, site visits, focus groups, and targeted surveys involving over 600 companies across a broad range of industries. This book summarizes their core research findings and conclusions, using case studies from such companies as Amoco, DuPont, Johnson & Johnson, UPS, Georgia Pacific, and others. Logistics and the Extended Enterprise will provide the reader with both the conceptual and analytic tools necessary to manage a global supply chain and put a world-class logistics operation in place.

Excerpt

This book is the result of a four-year, $1 million research project devoted to the study of best practices in logistics (also called supply-chain management). It is dedicated to answering one question of profound importance to business and governments worldwide as we enter the new millennium: How can organizations best use logistics/supplychain management practices to break down internal and external walls and become more effective Extended enterprises?

Over 600 companies across a broad range of industries shared their experiences in supply-chain reengineering with our team of university and industry specialists from the Supply Chain Management Center at the R. H. Smith School of Business, University of Maryland. Through interviews, site visits, focus groups, and targeted surveys, we gained first-hand insights into the tremendous challenges and opportunities facing these companies as they sought to manage purchasing, transportation, warehousing, and order management/customer service processes in a new and integrated way.

Our team was fortunate indeed to have mounted a largescale and well-funded research project at a time when the corporate role, mission, and technology of supply-chain management was in such deep, even radical flux. We have . . .

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