Why Does Schizophrenia Develop at Late Adolescence? A Cognitive-Developmental Approach to Psychosis

Why Does Schizophrenia Develop at Late Adolescence? A Cognitive-Developmental Approach to Psychosis

Why Does Schizophrenia Develop at Late Adolescence? A Cognitive-Developmental Approach to Psychosis

Why Does Schizophrenia Develop at Late Adolescence? A Cognitive-Developmental Approach to Psychosis

Synopsis

Governments around the world have given priority to "early intervention", i.e. the early diagnosis and treatment of young adults with psychotic symptoms.

One of the main problems with this approach, is that only a small proportion of these young adults can be expected to go on to develop schizophrenia, yet all the treatment regimes are derived from work with adults who have had full psychotic episodes.

Why Does Schizophrenia Develop at Late Adolescence? proposes a controversial new model of how schizophrenia develops in late adolescence and presents clinical material aimed at influencing the way psychosis is treated, building on a state-of-the-art reassessment of the field.

  • A major reconceptualisation of how schizophrenia develops
  • A controversial approach
  • Early intervention programmes are now extremely widespread, so there is much interest in the area and how best to treat this serious psychotic disorder

Excerpt

Schizophrenia, insanity, nervous breakdown – whatever the labels, these are some of the most distressing and dramatic experiences of the human condition. The notion of “madness” has occupied great thinkers throughout history. Shakespeare, for example, wrote often about different forms of “madness”. Since the turn of the last century, this “madness”, or schizophrenia, has been studied more methodically, and much more is known about it. However, the picture remains confusing and unclear.

In this book we develop an alternative approach to the established models which we believe helps clarify some of the core issues.

WHAT IS SCHIZOPHRENIA?

But first of all, we need to ask what exactly we are talking about. In truth, many of these terms – madness, breakdown, insanity – are lay terms which, if they are referring to a serious condition probably mean schizophrenia. But what is schizophrenia? Who are these “mad people”? We are talking about real people, people you probably know.

John

Meet Mr and Mrs Jones. They were worried sick about their 19-year-old son, John. He was a bit of a star – he was really popular with his numerous friends, he got good grades without much apparent effort, he was a natural sportsman. But even before the end of school, his parents had started to notice that he had begun acting quite differently. He seemed to be more withdrawn, often quite touchy, and he looked tired and strained. After he left school and got a job, the changes in his personality began to seem more like a Jekyll and Hyde transformation. One day John got really upset with his Dad and was accusing him of spying on him! This was so out of character and such a worrying development for John that his parents thought it safest to just check with their GP. The GP tried to reassure them it . . .

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