On Staffing: Advice and Perspectives from HR Leaders

On Staffing: Advice and Perspectives from HR Leaders

On Staffing: Advice and Perspectives from HR Leaders

On Staffing: Advice and Perspectives from HR Leaders

Synopsis

As HR leaders know, successful staffing is about much more than just hiring qualified people. Its about hiring the right qualified peopleand keeping them. To help you do that, On Staffing covers the new and innovative business initiatives managers from leading companies are using to assess the potential of people and place them in positions in which they can maximize that potential. It analyzes the practices that work, offers strategies for dealing with rapidly changing business and hiring environments, and helps HR leaders prepare for the changes and challenges to come.

Excerpt

The editors and contributors of this book consider the job of staffing— finding and developing the talent needed to deliver the highest-quality products and services—to be one of the most important and critical roles in any organization. We also believe that the systems, tools, and processes to support and measure effectiveness of talent acquisition and development initiatives are value-added investments. Thankfully, we have come a long way since the mid-1980s, when only a few enlightened organizations had started to improve their practices and processes as they recognized the critical nature and strategic value of staffing. At that time, “employment” positions were the lowest-paid in corporate HR, and external recruiters garnered little respect. Johnson & Johnson, Southwest Airlines, and The Vanguard Group were among the first organizations to recognize not only the importance of staffing but also the looming war for talent. These companies set out to fundamentally improve recruiting and best posture themselves for the challenges ahead. Ultimately, McKinsey coined the phrase “war for talent,” and wrote the book on it: The War for Talent by Ed Michaels, Beth Axelrod, and Helen Handfield-Jones.

Most organizations now recognize that having great people is the only way to create a sustainable, competitive advantage. And yet staffing remains a core strategy for only a few notable organizations that have, not coincidentally, a reputation for acquiring top talent and delivering better return for their stakeholders. Despite the progress we've made in this direction, staffing is not universally regarded as a strategic, valuable HR function. Positions in staffing are often filled internally or as entry-level positions with no training provided; there is often no clearly articulated recruiting or talent strategy; and there's rarely a deliberate process to identify, assess, and develop top talent or to measure the effectiveness of talent acquisition and development programs. Workforce planning is often done as part of a budget planning process rather than an overall talent, inventory, and forecasting effort. The technology that supports excellent recruiting and staffing initiatives is not always seen as a worthwhile . . .

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