Revelation: The Human Drama

Revelation: The Human Drama

Revelation: The Human Drama

Revelation: The Human Drama

Synopsis

Using Burkean methodology to understand various levels of symbolic meaning, this study shows that John creates a form of transcendence for early believers that extends into a pattern of continuity that other approaches to Revelation do not offer.

Excerpt

Due to the numerous citations herein from the major works of Kenneth Burke, I utilize a parenthical reference system for quotations from Burke's books of criticism and his novel. The abbreviations that I employ for Burke's books in the parenthetical references are to be found on the first pages of the bibliography. The abbreviations used are in bold letters and in parentheses following the corresponding full bibliographic entries. References to biblical texts and to classical texts are also listed parenthetically. All other quotations, including those from Burke's essays and articles, are referenced by endnotes. Biblical citations are generally from the New International Version. Comments are based on the Greek and Hebrew texts of the New and Old Testaments respectively. The texts of the original languages are cited in transliteration and translated when necessary to present observations that may be missed otherwise in the English translation. Occasionally, the Greek text of the Septuagint (hereafter LXX) is cited. The Septuagint is a Greek translation of the Hebrew Old Testament, produced two or three centuries before John wrote Revelation. Although John writes in Greek, he may be thinking in Hebrew. Therefore, correspondence between Greek and Hebrew terms often points to important issues.

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