Ancient Greeks West and East

Ancient Greeks West and East

Ancient Greeks West and East

Ancient Greeks West and East

Synopsis

This volume deals with the concept of West and East, as held by the ancient Greeks. Cultural exchange in Archaic and Classical Greece through the establishment of Hellenic colonies around the ancient world was an important development, and always a two-way process. To achieve a proper understanding of it requires study from every angle. All 24 papers in this volume combine different types of evidence, discussing them from every perspective: they are examined not only from the point of view of the Greeks but from that of the locals. The book gives new data, as well as re-examining existing evidence and reinterpreting old theories. The book is richly illustrated.

Excerpt

Gocha R. Tsetskhladze

In recent years the problem of the relationship between Greece and the other parts of the ancient world has become a more popular subject for investigation than ever before. Most publications concentrate on the Dark Age and the Orientalising period (for the latest see: Langdon 1997). Maybe the Dark Age has, step by step, come into the light (Snodgrass 1998, 12–39), but the question of GreekNear Eastern interactions continues under the shadow of hot debate. We can list Near Eastern objects found in Greece, but the mechanics of this cultural exchange remain largely a closed book to modern scholarship (Popham 1994; Morris 1997; cf. Snodgrass 1998, 40–66). the appearance of M.L. West's fine book (1997) sheds some light on West Asiatic elements in Greek poetry and myth. It must be noted that linguists are paying increased attention to these problems (Woodard 1997; Bernal 1997), helping to place a few more bricks in the foundations of our understanding of cultural interactions in the Dark Age and Archaic period. Thanks to Greek colonisation, and enormous efforts by classicists to understand this phenomenon, we are in a better position to make sense of cultural interactions in this period than in the Dark Age (cf. Guralnick 1997), although many gaps remain in our knowledge. There are several questions to which scholars cannot agree on the answers. For example, we still have too little rounded investigation of the reasons for Greek colonisation (cf Snodgrass 1994, 1; Miller 1997, 12–30). Another unsolved problem is who transported Euboean pottery. Does the presence of the pottery necessarily mean that the Euboeans themselves were present (Morris 1998; Papadopoulos 1996; 1997; 1998; Boardman 1996; Boardman and Popham 1997; Snodgrass 1994a; cf. Morel 1997; Ridgway 1997; 1999; Crielaard 1999; Euboica 1998)? Many further examples could be given. the contradictions arising between archaeologists and historians are another problem (Graham 1990, 52–4; Boardman 1991; 1998; Tsetskhladze 1994, 111–2; 1998, 19).

This book is not intended to present a catalogue of Greek objects found outside Greece and foreign objects found within Greece. Nor is it concerned exclusively with Greek colonisation. Rather, it seeks . . .

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