Christology, Controversy, and Community: New Testament Essays in Honour of David R. Catchpole

Christology, Controversy, and Community: New Testament Essays in Honour of David R. Catchpole

Christology, Controversy, and Community: New Testament Essays in Honour of David R. Catchpole

Christology, Controversy, and Community: New Testament Essays in Honour of David R. Catchpole

Synopsis

This collection of essays by an international team of prominent New Testament scholars is in honour of David Catchpole, recently retired from his position as the Saint Lukes Foundation Professor of Theological Studies at the University of Exeter, UK. The essays represent a range of approaches and topics, connected together by a focus on various kinds of christological claim, whether by the historical Jesus, in the Q tradition, John, Paul or the synoptics, and their connection with controversy and the construction of early Christian community. The contributors are: Stephen Barton, Peder Borgen, Richard Burridge, Marinus de Jonge, James Dunn, Earle Ellis, Birger Gerhardsson, Michael Goulder, Morna Hooker, John Kloppenburg Verbin, Robert Morgan, John Painter, Ronald Piper, Peter Richardson, Christopher Rowland, Graham Stanton, N. T. Wright, and the editors.

Excerpt

When we heard that David Catchpole planned to retire from his position as the St Luke's Foundation Professor of Theological Studies we immediately began to plan a Festschrift for him. Many of his colleagues in the field were more than willing to join in this venture to honour David—a warm tribute in itself to his qualities as scholar, teacher, administrator and friend. Others would have liked to contribute but were prevented by various circumstances from doing so. From any would-be contributors whom we have inadvertently overlooked, we ask forgiveness.

Right from the start we were clear that we wanted to give contributors the opportunity to write on a subject of their choice that would reflect their own research interests and approaches. We therefore hit upon a broad theme—or collection of themes—which would provide some coherence to the volume without unduly constraining the contributors. The essays therefore range across a wide diversity of topics and methods yet with some common threads running between them. Many of them explore the evidence, nature and consequences relating to various kinds of christological claim, whether by the historical Jesus, or in the Q tradition, in John, Paul, or the synoptics. Many of the essays, of course, interact directly with David Catchpole's own work, sometimes in agreement and support, sometimes critically. Many of them make fresh contributions to important debates, or develop new perspectives on New Testament texts. We trust that David Catchpole will enjoy these essays, and enjoy engaging with them, and that other New Testament scholars will find the collection worthy of their attention. We offer them to David as a token of esteem and affection—and look forward to hearing his (no doubt penetrating and perceptive) reactions to them.

Abbreviations throughout the volume follow the JBL conventions. Finally, David Horrell would like to thank Sally O'Shea, of the Department of Theology at Exeter, for her wisdom and help in regard to this project.

The Editors . . .

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