Handbook of Classical Rhetoric in the Hellenistic Period, 330 B.C.-A.D. 400

Handbook of Classical Rhetoric in the Hellenistic Period, 330 B.C.-A.D. 400

Handbook of Classical Rhetoric in the Hellenistic Period, 330 B.C.-A.D. 400

Handbook of Classical Rhetoric in the Hellenistic Period, 330 B.C.-A.D. 400

Synopsis

A comprehensive introduction to classical rhetoric as practised in the hellenistic period. The three sections define the major categories of rhetoric, analyze rhetorical practice according to genre, and treat individual writers in the rhetorical tradition.

Excerpt

This Handbook of Classical Rhetoric in the Hellenistic Period (330 BC-AD 400) has been a long time in the making. It has been an involved and lengthy editorial project, but it has been a very rewarding editorial task as well. I have had the opportunity to expand greatly my intellectual and academic horizons, both in terms of knowledge of writers of the ancient world and their use of rhetoric, and in terms of the scholars who have written on them. Graciousness prevents me from mentioning by name those who, though contractually obligated, backed out at the last moment. I am indeed thankful that in the vast majority of cases others willingly stepped forward to fill necessary gaps. To a person each of the final contributors has been very cooperative, preparing their work on time and going through the rigours of checking references and completing footnotes. Many of these contributors have offered continuing encouragement to me as well, as they got an inkling of the complexity of the editorial task. Of course, my opinion is severely biased, but I think that the end product more than justifies the incredible amounts of effort that the work in total represents. I can only hope that the final product is as beneficial to those who use it as it has been to those of us who have contributed to its creation.

Besides the individual contributors, each of whom deserves much gratitude and thanks, the following deserve special thanks. First, Julian Deahl and Hans van der Meij of Brill Publishers merit special mention. It was Julian who first contacted me about editing a project such as this, but it was Hans who has become an enduring friend. I judge the value of his friendship by his understanding of the hazards that this project has encountered, his gende (and sometimes not so gentle) nudging to push for completion, and his willingness to run interference with a few authors. Secondly, I wish to thank several institutions who have enabled work on this project to be undertaken, including Trinity Western University in British Columbia, Canada, and Roehampton Institute London, England. Although I was in transition some of the time that this project was being undertaken, each institution provided an excellent environment for my own work, including support of some of the necessary administrative costs of such . . .

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